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evil_fish evil_fish
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  • Joined: 29/7/2007 14:05
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  • Posted on: 30/7/2007 15:54
Re: Filter and tank Cleaning #21
i have had a baby biorb for about six ,seven weeks.And the filter is looking a bit brown should i follow the instructions with the new filter or is there a different way which is safer for the fish.

Any help would be great.

richard
mikedriscoll mikedriscoll
  • Pond Adviser
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  • Joined: 22/10/2006 10:17
  • From Wiltshire
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  • Posted on: 30/7/2007 16:30
Re: Filter and tank Cleaning #22
Not sure what the directions are in a bi orb but you should always do it this way.

Get two buckets.

Fill one with tap water and treat with tap safe or similar to get rid of chlorine ect. If the tank is a tropical use hot water from your kettle to adjust the temp so it matches the tank water. Do not use water from the hot water tap.

Syphon off the amount you are going to change into a bucket.
Wash out the filter sponges in the water you have just taken out of the tank. Never use tap water to clean filter media it will destroy all the good bacteria you have built up.

Top up the tank with the bucket you prepeared earlier and hey presto jobs a good un!
Mike Driscoll

Dont knock on Deaths door!
Ring the bell and run away!
Death hates that!
beeky beeky
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  • Posted on: 30/7/2007 16:34
Re: Filter and tank Cleaning #23
There's a link on here for maintaining a biorb. Apparently the instructions say to throw away a cartridge and put in a new one, but that way the whole cycling process has to start again. Unless, of course, the 'cartridges' are some chemical composition which adsorb ammonia/nitrite.
peediepixie peediepixie
  • Coldwater Moderator
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  • Joined: 2/10/2005 17:06
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  • Posted on: 3/8/2007 9:02
Re: Filter and tank Cleaning #24
hi Richard, here's the link for the Biorb article... maybe you should sit down before you read it!
http://www.fishkeeping.co.uk/modules/ ... /article.php?articleid=65
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Silvertip Silvertip
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  • Posted on: 11/10/2007 19:52
Re: Filter and tank Cleaning #25
Hi everyone.
I guess you might know this, but if you hold the pick up tube at an angle when siphoning, the sand and gravel swirls around releasing the gunk and then falls back to the tank bottom. Holding the pick up tube straight up causes the sand and gravel as well as the gunk to be drawn out of the tank at the same time.
cathie cathie
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  • Posted on: 11/10/2007 20:24
Re: Filter and tank Cleaning #26
Quote:

beeky wrote:
There's a link on here for maintaining a biorb. Apparently the instructions say to throw away a cartridge and put in a new one, but that way the whole cycling process has to start again. Unless, of course, the 'cartridges' are some chemical composition which adsorb ammonia/nitrite.


Just to clarify. It won't start the whole cycling process again as biorb runs on an undergravel filtration basis - so the ceramic media are the main source of filtration bacteria. BUT in our experience the sponge in the cartridge which manufacturers claim is only mechanical filtration actually is also an important part of biological filtration, and removal can cause ammonia/nitrITE spike. So it shouldn't be thrown away, just rinsed as discussed. The other bits in the cartridge are granules of carbon and zeolite - chemical filtration which we think you don't need unless adding carbon for some specific purpose e.g. to remove medications/stain in water; and zeolite which helps absorb ammonia - well - if biorb filtration is not coping with bioload, it's only sticking plaster, much better to up partial water changes and rethink stocking.
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Flossie Flossie
  • Not too shy to talk
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  • Joined: 8/8/2006 15:32
  • From West Midlands
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  • Posted on: 17/10/2007 21:56
Re: Filter and tank Cleaning #27
On the subject of using warm water from the kettle and not the hot tap. Does this also apply with water from a combi boiler where the water is drawn from the mains and heated up as it passes through the boiler? Or is it just for hot water tanks? Sounds silly I know but was just curious.
Karon
EagleC EagleC
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  • Posted on: 17/10/2007 22:00
Re: Filter and tank Cleaning #28
if you let the water run through the combi so that its fresh then it is probably fine. The main problem with hot tap water is if it comes from a storage container or boiler the bacteria may have grown, things may have fallen into the header tank and chemicals may have leached into it.
howler1244 howler1244
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  • Posted on: 2/1/2008 1:43
Re: Filter and tank Cleaning #29
I use a product called Nitra - Zorb in my filter. it looks like an oversized teabag . when I set up the indoor pond for the winter it does a great job removing the nitrites / nitrates and ammonnia , until the beneficial bacteria have had time to establish themselves in your pond / aquarium . I've found that not all pet stores sell it so you might have to shop around . they are also reuseable . keeping them in warm salt water for 2 to 3 hours removes the nitrites and ammonia and they are ready for re-use . hope this helps .So far i have found no downside to them .
Andrew-amano Andrew-amano
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  • Joined: 3/8/2006 0:26
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  • Posted on: 13/1/2008 22:50
Re: Filter and tank Cleaning #30
i cant comment for internals,. or cold waters as i am sure these set ups vary, but i have set my cannister up as a biological filter, i have packed it full of siporax, turned the flow right down, and i have not opened it in over 18 months, and its perfect.

I dont want people telling me that i need to clean it out because i dont. Its not a mechanical filter there is no debris in my tank, no waste organic matter, no waste food, i have shrimp for that. My filter is there to culture bacteria to break down the nasty stuff in water, the weekly water changes take care of the rest. I have found a happy medium between all other factors that go in to running my aquarium.

Basically if you are using sponges then yes you might need to clean these as they are a little ineffective in the job they are given to do. They cannot culture bacteria on a scale of siporax, so are likely to cause harm by retaining waste that is not being broken down.

As for the glass i use filter wool- you can buy it in packs roughly the size of an a4 sheet, look for it in the pond eqipment section, juwel owners should use this and cut it to shape, do it for all levels of the juwel, you are paying a silly premium for a precut sponge/wool. Anything other than wool for cleaning the glass can be too abrasive and scratch- esp acrylic tanks.
For the outside, its already been mentioned - kitchen towel, aquarium water then buff with a dry sheet- spotless. You dont want to use any detergent unlikely that it will get into the water but hey why risk it.


A.
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