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BClef BClef
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  • Posted on: 30/3/2013 20:23
New tank #1
Hi guys, got given a new tank. It's 18 inches in length and 12 inches in width and height.. according to a calculator this is roughly 10 UK gallons.

I understand this is quite small but are there any fish that could live comfortably in this?

I was thinking maybe a Betta and a few corys or shrimps.. would this sized tank be adequate for those?

If not is there anything I could keep in here?
Fishlady Fishlady
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  • Posted on: 30/3/2013 20:26
Re: New tank #2
That's the minimum size for a male Betta so I'd just keep one male alone in there if your water suits. Can you remind me of your tap water pH (after 24 hours) and gH please?
BClef BClef
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  • Posted on: 30/3/2013 20:31
Re: New tank #3
We've recently moved house but water is almost identical to the old I think.

pH - 6.4
kH - 1 drop
gH - 4 drops

Thanks.
Fishlady Fishlady
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  • Posted on: 30/3/2013 20:46
Re: New tank #4
That should be fine for a Betta, but I would add a tiny bit of bicarb to the water to get the kH up to 2 or you risk a pH/cycle crash.
BClef BClef
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  • Posted on: 31/3/2013 17:01
Re: New tank #5
Thanks FL, we've decided to go with a male betta for the 9 gallon tank and then buy a larger tank to get a tropical community up and running. No one told me fishkeeping was so addictive :)

Now to clean the tank up and start planning the plants and everything, so exciting :D Not sure what substrate to use,

Will I need to set up filtration and cycle as I normally would for other fish? I've read that they live best in still water but this doesn't seem right? Here's a snippet from an answer on google

Quote:
Riotfox, betta's are pretty low waste fish and to fishless cycle your tank with just a betta would just be a waste of your time and effort.


Thanks.
Fishlady Fishlady
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Re: New tank #6
Do cycle it. The opinion there is from someone who's likely of the school that cycling fish in with a low bioload is OK as long as the fish doesn't die. While it's true that a low bioload of fish can sometimes survive the cycle, they will experience discomfort from even small amounts of ammonia and nitrite in the water and potentially shorter lives/damaged immune responses as a result.

Bettas don't like a lot of water movement. This is partly because of their native habitat which is densely planted still water, and partly because the Betta splendens we see in shops is very far removed from its wild relatives. Line breeding to create those glorious long fins has made it hard for them to swim and particularly to deal with currents.

They do, like all fish kept in tanks need a filter. Without filtration ammonia will be a permanent presence in small volume of water. Those kept by some breeders in unfiltered tanks are able to survive it because they are given massive chemically and temperature matched daily water changes and kept in virtually sterile conditions where no food or waste is allowed to accumulate and the tanks are usually bare of any substrate, decor or planting. Not a nice way to live!

When you have the tank set up with filter and ready to go, switch the filter media for a piece of sponge form your goldy tank. Then dose with ammonia as though cycling and see how well it copes. You may find it is instantly cycled, or at the least, the cycling time will be shorter.
BClef BClef
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  • Posted on: 1/4/2013 10:25
Re: New tank #7
Thanks FL, really informative post as always :) I'll make sure to cycle it before I add a fish.

Unfortunately I don't think I'll be able to use a piece of sponge from my goldy tank as the filter that came with the small tank has a cylinder shaped sponge that fits around a hollow plastic tube.

Soooo.. a long fishless cycle it is, suppose it will give me time to establish plants and design the tank exactly how I want it in the meantime :)
DaveGodfrey DaveGodfrey
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  • Posted on: 1/4/2013 14:58
Re: New tank #8
Take a bit of the goldfish filter out and swap it with the filter for the betta tank. The bacteria will gradually spread to the new media over a couple of weeks (as you've culled some of their population). Using this as a starting colony you can then put it in the new tank and start adding ammonia. You may find you get an "instant cycle" that way, but it isn't guarantee, so I'd test it out with ammonia rather than fish obviously. You'll certainly reduce your cycling time.

The sponge filter needs an air pump to work. the pump forces air though the sponge pullin water with it and circulating the water over the bacteria living on the sponge. They're very popular with betta keepers as they don't create much water movement. Shrimp keepers like them too, as the shrimp will pick morsels of food off them. (Whether you can keep shrimp and bettas together depends on the personality of the betta.)
Loaches, Barbs, Minnows & Shrimp! Oh My!
aqualife2u aqualife2u
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  • Posted on: 1/4/2013 17:20
Re: New tank #9
Perfect for a singe Betta or may be some shrimps.
BClef BClef
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  • Posted on: 2/4/2013 16:30
Re: New tank #10
Thanks guys,unfortunately the filter with the small tank isn't a sponge filter, had to google it but it's just a normal filter with a hollow cylinder sponge in it, which will be impossible to replicate with the sponge from my Eheim. I'm going to order a sponge filter though and go through the process, that sounds much easier and they seem quite cheap..

Any recommendations for a sponge filter?

Also what substrate would be best? Ideally I want the bottom to be covered in grass like plants so maybe thinking of peat or similar?