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Eggbut Eggbut
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  • Posted on: 9/3/2011 16:21
Drains in ponds #1
Hi,

we are now looking [seriously] at dgging our first pond [M did have one when he was growing up, but a lot has changed since then!].

For me it is all totally new.

I have been reading around about what we need to do, and I've read a couple of times that a drain in the bottom of the pond is essential.

Now, I KNOW I'm being thick here, but how does that work?

I thought that the filter moved the water about and 'filtered' it, a pump would also help keep it aerated and we also plan on having a water-fall effect at the end.

I then thought that we would remove water at some point [haven't gone into this side of it yet] like we do with the tanks, and replace with treated water.

So....where does the drain come in to this please?

Thanks [in advance],

EB x.
Dolhin Seabray 500 litres with four Fancy Goldies & 5 White Clo
Anonymous  
Re: Drains in ponds #2
Basically a drain gravity feeds the water to the filter rather than having a pump in the pond. The pump is then inside or near to the filter pumping water back into the pond, sort of reversing things a little. It is not essential for a standard pond but is essential really for a large koi pond and it can get a bit expensive, costing a few grand to do it properly. If all you want is a wildlife pond with goldfish then the normal pump-in-pond-to-filter sytem will be fine and a lot cheaper. I think 2010 did an article or something on it I will try to find it.

2010s Article 1

2010s Article 2

2010s Article 3

2010s Article 4
Miss pril Miss pril
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  • Posted on: 9/3/2011 16:49
Re: Drains in ponds #3
I'd love a pond!

We did have one when i was younger but i fell in it so we rehomed the fish and it got filled.

Moral of the story - DON'T FALL IN PONDS!
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Anonymous  
Re: Drains in ponds #4
The pond I had you could swim in, and did on a couple of accidental occasions. Couple of my fish below.

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Eggbut Eggbut
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  • Posted on: 9/3/2011 17:00
Re: Drains in ponds #5
Ah, thanks for that Jaguar - it's a good job you're about today!!

I've been working my way through all of those, but I've also got some leaflets on how to set up a pond, and I've also looked around the internet.

We aren't going to have Koi - we are only doing this for Luke & Leia [our adopted goldies], but we're obviously going to add some some more as well!!

I think the size is going to be [approx] 24 feet by 4 feet and 4 feet deep I think it's going to be about 6 - 7,000 litres - I think [M's told me a couple of times but I don't keep numbers in my head very well ]

So it won't be suitable for Koi...but we should be able to have a few goldies in there.

Thanks for the links, I'll be going through them all....we've got to get this done this year, L & L are approx. 8 inches now, really should NOT be in a 180 litre tank!!
Dolhin Seabray 500 litres with four Fancy Goldies & 5 White Clo
Eggbut Eggbut
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Re: Drains in ponds #6
OOOH....lovely photo...I do like Koi.

We were going to put it down the bottom of the garden [so could have been bigger], but our house [hint in the name 'Orchard House'!! ] is full of trees!!

Also, it's too far away....we can't see our garden from the house [there's an annexe and out-buildings, then a drive , then two openings into the garden - so can't see beyond the openings].

The electrics would have been a nightmare too

We're going to make the bottom of the garden into an 'allotment' now....raised beds will need to be made first though! Plus we'll need a green-house, plus..........

It goes on and on doesn't it?!

We have the remains of an old kidney shaped pond half way down, so I'm hoping to get that sorted and have it as a wild-life pond too.

I'll be old and grey by the time all this happens.....
Dolhin Seabray 500 litres with four Fancy Goldies & 5 White Clo
Anonymous  
Re: Drains in ponds #7
You are going to need to fairly powerful pump and and filter for that size. If you are digging out to that depth you may as well go for the drain then. As the water pressure is going to be just enough. The dimensions you give makes a volume of around 10874 liters.

You can still use the pump-to-filter method but the filter will need to be at about the height of the waterfall if you are going to have one and you will need a pump and filter capable of shifting between 15-20000 litres per hour with a max head of twice or three times the height of the waterfall to get a good flow back down into the pond rather than a trickle.

You will need electric to the pond for a pump and filter, are you saying you cant get any electric to the pond?
Miss pril Miss pril
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  • Posted on: 9/3/2011 17:25
Re: Drains in ponds #8
Wow that sounds complicated! (Or maybe its just me!)

You're fish are lovely Jaguar!

Eggbutt if you would like another goldy for your pond i have a lovely comet who is bound to outgrow the tank soon haha!

Actually I think 3/4 hours would be abit too far to travel haha!
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Eggbut Eggbut
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Re: Drains in ponds #9
Hi Jaguar.....I've probably got it wrong then...It could have been 8,000 litres [!] - I'll ask M again tonight.

We're only going to dig down 20'ish inches, the rest will be built up.

We were originally going to have the pond down the bottom of the garden [there is an electric supply at the neck of the garden - still quite a way from the bottom].

But, now we're having it just beyond one of the out-buildings, and that has electricity in it, so we're OK now.

How does 20 feet x 3 feet x 4 feet deep sound - I think that may have been the last size mentioned - although 4 feet wide would be better.

The 'waterfall' will be at the top end, against a wall - we'll be puting stones at an angle against it - somewhere between a big trickle and an actual 'waterfall' - hopefully looking quite natural.

I'll get M to look at what you've said....he's been looking at some of the threads you gave me today already.

What a shame you're so far away Mr Pril....where abouts in Berkshire are you?

EB x.
Dolhin Seabray 500 litres with four Fancy Goldies & 5 White Clo
Anonymous  
Re: Drains in ponds #10
yes 4 wide by 3 deep would be better. Or 25L x 12W x 7D is a lovely size and makes a lovely centrepiece to any garden. Its only 59465 litres and a wonderful site full of Koi carp.