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longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 13/4/2008 19:07
Re: Feeding Garlic #41
Depends on the batch of fish TBH, some fish go straight for it , other straight out dont like it, wont know till you try. Its not really a treat item, that would be stuff like livefoods, brineshrimp, bloodworm etc. Just use it when fish need a purge.
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Ickl Devil Ickl Devil
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  • Posted on: 28/7/2008 13:39
Re: Feeding Garlic #42
Sorry I know I'm full of stupid questions but just wondered how should garlic and any veg should be served to fish?

I've read that for variety and fiber, Bettas can be fed high-protein veg such as soybeans, green beans, broccoli, corn, and carrots . But does that mean cooked, raw, minced or chunky?? Also heard about feeding spinnach and cucumber.
longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 28/7/2008 14:01
Re: Feeding Garlic #43
Generally most veg offerred to fish should be blanched on three counts, making it easier to eat and digest and the plant protiens more accessable, and to break the tannin spears that build up to long term damage from kidney stones, and also to deactivate pyrethrin pesticides which will eventually cause liver damage and possibly some neurological damage too.

As for how its offerred , that depends on you fis's dentition, and lip structure. Uaru, dollars , severums etc, will pick things to bits, so you just throw some in, plecs and ottos will rasp stuff, loaches have good incising teeth, so again they can just attack large chunks. Goldfish, bettas, and many other fish will need it diced into tiny pieces or shredded.

Oh, and watch any food from the cabbage family, like greens, kale and spinach, all extremely high in tannins again, they must only be fed to any animal in small proportions and infrequently. The oxylates in them bind any calcium ingested the same day into calcium oxylate that cant be used by the body. Overdoing the cabbage family is quite an easy way to give the fish a major calcium deficiency, and mineralisation of the kidneys. Its also true in reptiles too. Blanching the cabbage family reduces that effect a little, but not altogether. Thats why people use romaine lettuce, its not as nutrient deficient as other lettuces, though its still not really a nutrient rich food, but it doesnt have anything like the oxylate level of the cabbage family. Combine romaine with artificial diets and it serves it purpose in leveling out the fishs fibre and browsing needs.

Garlic should only be used as a purgative, there has never been any evidence of it improving immune response in fish.

On the veg end, also consider fruit, figs, bits of papaya, dried chopped apricots, all great sources of nutrition, all with vitamic c which really will help the immune system, but you must clean them all away if not eaten within a few hours, as they contain quite a few sugars and will pollute the aquarium. Pears in particular seem hellish for that.

Anyone using lots of veg and fruit foods must be extra vigilant of substrate cleaning, the sugars in the items can cause major sulphide production. The richer plant protien sources would be banana and avocado, banana can be raw, avocado is better lightly cooked. Both have enough fat to make a fish obese, but good for getting bulk on those skinny veggie fish. Some fish eat red peppers, usually raw or lightly cooked, and almost the entire squash family from courgette to butternut and pumpkin can be used too, some fish will eat sweet potato too, but again on the oxylate front, they should be lightly cooked. Most people wont bother cooking them for plecs, but most fish will need them cooked or at least lightly blanched(again theres always the pyrethrins pesticides and oxylate factor to consider) but people who organically grow their own can avoid blanching and cooking foods as long as they have a low tannin/oxylate content.

Then of course you have sacrificial plants like riccia, pennywort, elodea etc. Most active herbivores with a decent bite will happily strip them.

When you get into feeding leafy plants to fish, you have to get into understanding plant defenses. Tannins being the primary one. Obviously any plant that produces latex will be lethal. Thats actually why there are lots of detritivore fish living in rivers, partially decomposed plants actually lose tannins, making them safer to eat (thats decomposed in running water, flushes out the tannins) thats why there are so many plant detritivores in river system like the amazon. The blackwater is really the giveaway as to where those tannins have gone, and why the rotted plant material is safer to eat. There are hundreds of catfish that feed like that.
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Ickl Devil Ickl Devil
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  • Posted on: 28/7/2008 17:22
Re: Feeding Garlic #44
Great stuff, lots for me to go on. Thankyou.
Johan Johan
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  • Posted on: 7/5/2010 21:22
Re: Feeding Garlic #45
I know this is an old thread, but garlic is actually beneficial to tropical fish.

However, garlic addition to a marine system has shown no benefits to date.

I have the research paper on my web-site but it is in a member only area. If any of you are interested in reading the research papers, drop me a PM with your e-mail address and I'll e-mail it to you.
rak-aqua rak-aqua
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  • Posted on: 10/9/2010 20:50
Re: Feeding Garlic #46
much easier and more convenient is just buy food with garlic for example, D-Allio from Tropical
It is for discus fish but I am sure that it is also good for other fish
Fishy-Fishy Fishy-Fishy
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  • Posted on: 16/9/2010 20:11
Re: Feeding Garlic #47
I fed my fish this food with added garlic and they loved it-http://food4fish.co.uk/frozen-brine-shrimp-garlic.html

But as we know, flake food is a staple and not a complete diet so you should still complement with fresh, frozen or live food (or all three, lucky fish!)
NeeNee NeeNee
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  • Posted on: 6/3/2012 13:57
Re: Feeding Garlic #48
Just put some banana in to see what happens...

Rosy barbs = yum yum yum
Black tetra = mmMmm not bad
Harlequin = err no thanks
Clown loach = WHAT is that???

I'll leave it in there for a little while longer before removing any leftovers.
127 Litre Tank
Stock: 2 Clown Loach, 5 Harlequin, 5 Rosy Barb, 4 Black Tetra, 4 Live Plants, 2 x Bogwood
Daniel_G Daniel_G
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  • Posted on: 7/3/2012 17:14
Re: Feeding Garlic #49
How would one go about feeding garlic to tetras?
Are there any good veggie recipes, or all round good veggies for Tetras?

Thanks,
Dan
Violet Violet
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  • Posted on: 7/3/2012 18:10
Re: Feeding Garlic #50
You can buy good qualtity tropical flake food from the internet that has garlic already added.

I used a very pongy flake made from earthworms with garlic once - good grief, its smelt quite pongy but the fish loved it. Have a bit of a moochy on the internet.
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