« 1 (2) 3 »
Steveo Steveo
  • Home away from home
  • Home away from home
  • Joined: 30/9/2010 9:24
  • From Hampshire
  • Group: Registered Users FK Supporter
  • Posts: 279
  • Posted on: 27/10/2010 15:13
Re: Hard Water Fish - suited to tropical set up #11
Ok been a long time since anyone posted on this thread !!

Starting out with tropical fish and i have hard water in my area so i found the site on this thread of great use. I was disappointed when i realised i didn't have soft water, as i was looking forward to some tetras - what attracted me was the way they shoal in large groups.

My question is are there any hard water fish that shoal in a similar way to tetras?
Fishlady Fishlady
  • Tropical Moderator
  • Tropical Moderator
  • Joined: 6/7/2010 19:26
  • From Worcestershire
  • Group: Caresheets Moderators FK Supporter Registered Users Image Admin Advisers
  • Posts: 13408
  • Posted on: 27/10/2010 16:49
Re: Hard Water Fish - suited to tropical set up #12
First species that springs to mind is the Dwarf Neon Rainbow Fish (Melanotaenia Praecox).

Will have a think about other possibilities....
Fishy-Fishy Fishy-Fishy
  • Tropical Moderator
  • Tropical Moderator
  • Joined: 30/8/2004 12:51
  • From -
  • Group: Registered Users Moderators Advisers FK Supporter Deep End
  • Posts: 9604
  • Posted on: 27/10/2010 17:06
Re: Hard Water Fish - suited to tropical set up #13
Yes, rainbow fish are shoalers and there are several species. They are often called the 'hard water tetras'.

What do you mean by 'shoaling like tetras' btw? They need to be in a shoal but shoaling fish only do that tight grouping moving in unison thing when they feel threatened, the rest of the time they just float around doing their own thing but keeping their friends in sight just in case
Steveo Steveo
  • Home away from home
  • Home away from home
  • Joined: 30/9/2010 9:24
  • From Hampshire
  • Group: Registered Users FK Supporter
  • Posts: 279
  • Posted on: 27/10/2010 20:40
Re: Hard Water Fish - suited to tropical set up #14
Ah ok i always thought that was one way in which they moved around the tank - wasn't aware it was only when they felt threatened !

I've looked at rainbow fish before and they're ones i really like so defo a possibility
Onyxia Onyxia
  • Plants Adviser
  • Plants  Adviser
  • Joined: 31/10/2010 13:47
  • From London
  • Group: Advisers Deep End Registered Users
  • Posts: 600
  • Posted on: 2/11/2010 17:38
Re: Hard Water Fish - suited to tropical set up #15
My local fish shop says my hard alkaline water is typical of my area but the only suitable fish they have are cichlids. They suggest using water sofeners and ph balancers if I want a smaller type of fish.

Am I being fed total rubbish? If so can anyone recommend a good fish shop in central London? Assuming a 30 min tube ride is acceptable for fish transport?

Hmm thats a lot of questions in one paragraph, sorry : /

Oh btw I havnt got a tank yet, I want to make sure I know what fish are suitable/available before I make the big purchase :D
Fizz Fizz
  • Home away from home
  • Home away from home
  • Joined: 12/2/2006 19:19
  • From Hertfordshire
  • Group: Registered Users FK Supporter Deep End
  • Posts: 708
  • Posted on: 2/11/2010 18:45
Re: Hard Water Fish - suited to tropical set up #16
Hey Onxyia,

There are plenty of smaller fish suitable for harder water - guppies, mollies, endlers and swordtails to name the most common and popular.

I wouldn't start 'adjusting' your water hardness or PH unless you want a serious headache at a later date. Chemical PH balancers aren't reliable in the longer term and can actually cause more harm than good. The only reliable way to change the water hardness and PH is by adding RO water (purified)to your water change mixed with tap water each week. I do this and it's a huge effort.

It would be really helpful if you got hold of a couple of water tests - if you could test of GH, KH and PH the people on this forum could better advise on what fish would be suitable.

hope this helps,
Fizz
Steveo Steveo
  • Home away from home
  • Home away from home
  • Joined: 30/9/2010 9:24
  • From Hampshire
  • Group: Registered Users FK Supporter
  • Posts: 279
  • Posted on: 3/11/2010 10:30
Re: Hard Water Fish - suited to tropical set up #17
Does anyone know the adult size of a male guppy? I've seen some sites say they're 2.5 cm, and some say 4cm. Trying to work out the stock for my tank but can't see to get a reliable figure (most say 5cm but that's the female)

Thanks
Fishlady Fishlady
  • Tropical Moderator
  • Tropical Moderator
  • Joined: 6/7/2010 19:26
  • From Worcestershire
  • Group: Caresheets Moderators FK Supporter Registered Users Image Admin Advisers
  • Posts: 13408
  • Posted on: 3/11/2010 12:08
Re: Hard Water Fish - suited to tropical set up #18
Hi Steve,

They're about an inch, so 2.5 cm
Steveo Steveo
  • Home away from home
  • Home away from home
  • Joined: 30/9/2010 9:24
  • From Hampshire
  • Group: Registered Users FK Supporter
  • Posts: 279
  • Posted on: 3/11/2010 12:18
Re: Hard Water Fish - suited to tropical set up #19
Nice one, i was thinking that was the approx size but kept getting conflicting info. This site i do trust however :)
hague1982 hague1982
  • Home away from home
  • Home away from home
  • Joined: 11/10/2010 23:59
  • From Lancashire
  • Group: Registered Users Basic Membership
  • Posts: 215
  • Posted on: 21/4/2011 0:53
Re: Hard Water Fish - suited to tropical set up #20
??? I soften my water using sulphuric acid and it gets my water from a 7.6pH to a 6-6.5pH my 3Gh and 5KH stay the same which is pretty low for my Blue ram tank! I find i have to buffer my water for my other tanganyikan fish quite alot but it's worth it! granted i may of increased the conductivity so to speak of my ram tank but i'n pretty clueless on that front!