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lionhead lionhead
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  • Posted on: 27/3/2007 20:36
Re: Biotope #11
Will panda corys b ok by themselves (as in the only panda cory). If so what "gravel stuff" would i get?? Or are there other corys that like to live by themselves, with other species in the tank??
Fishy-Fishy Fishy-Fishy
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  • Posted on: 27/3/2007 22:04
Re: Biotope #12
Corys will be fine in a group of at least 6 (make sure you don't overcrowd!), they don't need another species to keep them company if that's what you mean. Corys need a sand substrate to stop their barbels getting damaged.
EagleC EagleC
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  • Posted on: 28/3/2007 12:36
Re: Biotope #13
Thats a bit harsh, but - if a newbie like me was to change from fake to real plants what would you suggest as being the lowest maintenance easy care options? After all I like fish not plants! Currently I have tetras, corys and mollies so south american plants should fit best.

Also - how deep should my substrate be?

Cheers
lionhead lionhead
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  • Posted on: 28/3/2007 12:42
Re: Biotope #14
I just found this awsome fish. The cokato dwarf cichlid its so kool. The only problem is they protect their eggs to ensure the survival of their species. Does that mean i will easily get babies?? The other problem is that in communities shoaling fish are good, but they like 1 male to 3 females. So i already have 9" of fish and only 3" left tops!! So the question is what should i do??
Coralline Coralline
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  • Posted on: 28/3/2007 13:06
Re: Biotope #15
Quote:

EagleC wrote:
Thats a bit harsh, but - if a newbie like me was to change from fake to real plants what would you suggest as being the lowest maintenance easy care options? After all I like fish not plants! Currently I have tetras, corys and mollies so south american plants should fit best.

Also - how deep should my substrate be?

Cheers


whats a bit harsh?

'newbies' should be encouraged to use real plants from the start, most plants are very easy, generally delicate looking plants are the hardest ones to grow. its not about liking plants over fish. plants are part of a succesful tank. unfortunately many shops stock plants that are not true aquatic plants because some of them have attractive leaf shapes, but they dont look nice for long, do not grow and rot away. as far as newbies who end up trying to grow these plants are concerned, this makes them think that aquatic plants are hard to grow, and many dont bother again...

any plants will work, they do not have to be from the same geographical area, unless your setting up a biotope.

vallis, cryptocorynes, java fern, java moss, anubias, amazon swords (and other sword plant varieties)... could go on, but just a few good ones to start with.

tanks without plants need diffeerent types of filter media to remove nasties, which plants would deal with in a planted tank. plants arent difficult, anyone who thinks they are, just isnt doing it right im afraid!
Gill

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EagleC EagleC
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  • Posted on: 28/3/2007 13:19
Re: Biotope #16
Thanks!
Being a newbie other than helping my son thus far with his small unplanted tank I have read books and talked to shop keepers and come to the conclusion that real plants are not required when you have a decent filter.
From your post this is all wrong, hence it sounded a little 'harsh' a judgement on those who think otherwise.

I'll take your list here and go and do a little research as I'm setting up a new tank this weekend so I might as well try and get it right!
Thanks.
Fishadmin Fishadmin
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  • Posted on: 28/3/2007 13:25
Re: Biotope #17
Quote:

lionhead wrote:
So the question is what should i do??


If I were you I would write a list of all the options you have to you with your tank and then choose one.

ie

Option 1: Cichlid set up (with correct environment)
Option 2: Biotope set up (fish and live plants)

but in more detail. You can then go off round the internet and research, research, research until you've made a decision. At the moment you coming at your project and us from all angles and not making much sense!
Coralline Coralline
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  • Posted on: 28/3/2007 13:26
Re: Biotope #18
Quote:

EagleC wrote:
...read books and talked to shop keepers and come to the conclusion that real plants are not required when you have a decent filter.
From your post this is all wrong, hence it sounded a little 'harsh' a judgement on those who think otherwise.


if you read Diana Walstads book, 'the ecology of the planted aquarium', her opinion is that a well planted tank needs no filtration (only some circultaion to prevent water going stagnant).
you can use expensive filter medias to help control water quality, or plants. plants being a cheaper, renewable and more attractive option, is much preferable IMO!

much better to buy plants online too, down to the unreliableness of many shops. online stockists (good ones) will giv the scientific name of the plant too, and will also be cheaper than most shops, in my experience.
Gill

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Fishy-Fishy Fishy-Fishy
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  • Posted on: 28/3/2007 13:31
Re: Biotope #19
Yeah I agree that almost all successful fishkeepers use real plants unless there is a reason not to (ie if the fish will eat them all).

I got a catalogue from plants alive, I haven't ordered anything from them yet but the catalogue is really detailed.
EagleC EagleC
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  • Posted on: 28/3/2007 13:44
Re: Biotope #20
Just ordered that catalogue myself now. Seems like you get a lot of plants in their collection for only a few quid... whats the catch!?