andusbeckus andusbeckus
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  • Posted on: 6/10/2012 18:41
New tank algae #1
I finished fishless cycle on my 30l shrimp tank about 2 weeks ago and ever since I have had algae problems. My tank is heavily planted and has a pressurized c02 system with a 30w Arcadia LED light (this one).

The light and c02 are on 8 hours a day and I dose flourish comprehensive and flourish NPK.

Can dosing too many nutrients cause algae as I'm sometimes quite generous with amounts!
DaveGodfrey DaveGodfrey
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  • Posted on: 6/10/2012 22:20
Re: New tank algae #2
Yes. You need to strike a balance between nutrients, light, and CO2. Too much of any one in proportion to the others will allow algae to grow at the expense of your plants.
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SH4RKN0S3 SH4RKN0S3
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  • Posted on: 7/10/2012 7:50
Re: New tank algae #3
Few questions: what kind of plants do you have, what's their growth like, what's your filtration like and what kind of algae do you have? I'd also consider reducing your lighting period down for a bit, increasing it again once the algae is under control.
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SO19Firearms SO19Firearms
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  • Posted on: 9/10/2012 11:22
Re: New tank algae #4
Quote:

andusbeckus wrote:
Can dosing too many nutrients cause algae as I'm sometimes quite generous with amounts!


No.
Best thing to do is identify the type of algae and then you can work on the cure.
In relation to your light the chances are, you aren't dosing enough of the NPK, your CO2 input isn't keeping up with the amount of light or your flow isn't passing it all around adequately.

Quote:

DaveGodfrey wrote:
Too much of any one in proportion to the others will allow algae to grow at the expense of your plants.


No. Too much light in relation to the others. But you can't have too much fert or CO2...not from an algae stand point in a planted tank.
The light always needs to be less than CO2 or Ferts - Liebig's Law.


IMO
DaveGodfrey DaveGodfrey
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  • Posted on: 9/10/2012 18:24
Re: New tank algae #5
Quote:

SO19Firearms wrote:
Quote:

DaveGodfrey wrote:
Too much of any one in proportion to the others will allow algae to grow at the expense of your plants.


No. Too much light in relation to the others. But you can't have too much fert or CO2...not from an algae stand point in a planted tank.
The light always needs to be less than CO2 or Ferts - Liebig's Law.

IMO


I was thinking of Liebig's Barrel (clearly wrongly) when I wrote that. That and eutrophication from various sources (farms, sewage works, etc). Which involves levels of fertilisers (particularly nitrates) rather higher than you'd be comfortable with in an aquarium.
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Onyxia Onyxia
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  • Posted on: 9/10/2012 19:46
Re: New tank algae #6
From some intensive tinkering with my tanks I can say that low nitrate levels encourage fluffy diatom algae, high nitrate levels encourage hair algae in my moss and inconsistent macro dosing leads to green spot on my crypts. Also do not starve bacopa, its not at all tolerant of low nitrate conditions and takes forever to recover! Not in the slightest bit scientific but those are my personal observations over both tanks.

Back to the op: Is that light in the link really what you have? The link is to a sexy marine spotlight but it looks too intense for an average freshwater set up. Even assuming that isn't your light I would still lower the photo period, introduce a siesta if you haven't already and see if it helps. TBH start with the light and if that doesn't work tinker with everything one by one until you get the required result.
andusbeckus andusbeckus
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  • Posted on: 10/10/2012 9:02
Re: New tank algae #7
Quote:

Back to the op: Is that light in the link really what you have? The link is to a sexy marine spotlight but it looks too intense for an average freshwater set up. Even assuming that isn't your light I would still lower the photo period, introduce a siesta if you haven't already and see if it helps. TBH start with the light and if that doesn't work tinker with everything one by one until you get the required result.


Yeah that's the light and it's a freshwater light although there is a version for marine. Reduced my lighting period down to 6 hours and have been measuring my dosage of ferts the last few days. So far the algae has not come back and everything seems to be doing well.

I think balance is the key!
SO19Firearms SO19Firearms
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  • Posted on: 10/10/2012 10:06
Re: New tank algae #8
Quote:

DaveGodfrey wrote:
I was thinking of Liebig's Barrel (clearly wrongly) when I wrote that. That and eutrophication from various sources (farms, sewage works, etc). Which involves levels of fertilisers (particularly nitrates) rather higher than you'd be comfortable with in an aquarium.


Ahhh I get ya.
Liebig can be used to gauge the failure of the plant - and it's that failure (usually releasing trace ammonia) that causes the algae.
While it's true that run off etc will increase algae it isn't the reason it's there generally. We can go the other way to prove these things with eutrophic dosing like EI and not get algae....and its then we find the relations with CO2 and light becomes more apparent.


The bottom line IMO is if you want to put the sun* above your tank you'll need alot of CO2 aswell as ferts, if you put less light, you'll need less CO2 and get away with less ferts.....

*epiphany - Direct sunlight causes algae...because the need for CO2 increases... /lightbulb