Animal Welfare Vote
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geoff geoff
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  • Posted on: 30/7/2012 20:56
mbuna and haps #1
hi all ...... addiction is here !!! got a 2nd tank this to duplicate my rooms alcoves lol

going down the malawi route so here goes

water @ 8.00 ph consistent
gh @ 16.8
kh @ 7.2

tank size 100cm length x 40cm wide x 60 tall (250 lite)
substrate playsand and looking at limestone or slate for lots of hides and caves.

looking for mbuna for bottom dwellers of may be around 10 and been told Haps for top of tank ...may be 5/6 mediums

or alternatley if i stock the rocks etc higher will the mbuna take the space and so take more mbuna ???

hope this make sense ............Geoff
Fishlady Fishlady
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  • Posted on: 30/7/2012 21:16
Re: mbuna and haps #2
Hi Geoff,

It's not really recommended to combine Mbuna and Haps. The main reason is dietary requirements. Mbuna are almost entirely vegetarian where Haps need meaty foods. If Mbuna get too much protein they can't digest it properly and fall victim to "Malawi bloat". Unfortunately they will quite happily eat the foods that cause them problems which is why they are best kept separately from Haps.

A larger rockpile (firmly fixed) will spread the Mbuna through the tank as they take up areas of territory.

HTH
geoff geoff
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  • Posted on: 31/7/2012 8:03
Re: mbuna and haps #3
Thank you FL once again the font of all knowledge .... i think my LFS was may be trying to make some extra cash,

The rock pile .......what do you suggest as ive looked at lots of them and im wondering how much weight my tanks bottom will take.

G
Fishlady Fishlady
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  • Posted on: 31/7/2012 8:13
Re: mbuna and haps #4
A lot of people put egg crate on the bottom to prevent damage from accidental falls and increased pressure. Then it's a case of spreading the load evenly so the weight is distributed across the bottom and not too concentrated at one end.

When you think about the weight of water a tank has to hold, the rock makes little difference as long as the load is well balanced and the tank is supported as per manufacturer's instructions and properly levelled.

You can reduce the weight in Rift Lake tanks by using some Ocean Rock, which is actually limestone and full of holes and is less dense than solid rocks, or Lava Rock which is also lighter than the same volume of rocks like slate.
geoff geoff
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  • Posted on: 31/7/2012 10:47
Re: mbuna and haps #5
thanks FL

might have to buy this from Internet site as no local stockist at good prcies ....so what advice can u give on the size KG package is should look at ..... may be upto 16 mbuna in 250 litres unit
Fishlady Fishlady
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  • Posted on: 31/7/2012 10:53
Re: mbuna and haps #6
The more rock the better for Mbuna, though you do want some swimming space too. I would "guesstimate" around 30-40 Kgs of Ocean Rock for a tank that size.
geoff geoff
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Re: mbuna and haps #7
brilliant .....thanks FL .... off to spend spend spend !!
cathie cathie
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  • Posted on: 31/7/2012 18:41
Re: mbuna and haps #8
An alternative to egg crate is koi grid (just search for it on eBay) which might be cheaper.
[url=http://www.bigfishcam
geoff geoff
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  • Posted on: 1/8/2012 10:20
Re: mbuna and haps #9
hi FL,

my Ph is 8.00 ish constant ......will using coral sand and coral ock increase the PH too high ?? or does it stabalise it more so to say 8.3 etc

im concearned that the level of aquascaping will raise my PH very high

g
Fishlady Fishlady
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  • Posted on: 1/8/2012 10:30
Re: mbuna and haps #10
Corals and limestone act as buffers and while in a low pH environment they will raise pH, their real function is to try and keep an equilibrium. Above a certain level they no longer dissolve so there is a limit to how high the pH will go, and the higher the starting pH the larger the amount of additional carbonate that is needed to effect even a minor further increase. As pH approaches 8, the rate at which carbonates from decor dissolve into the water slows down drastically and the amount that needs to dissolve to raise pH further increases drastically. In effect this means pH will be unlikely to rise in a tank with a starting pH of 8 that has a large regular weekly water change as is needed for Malawis, and if a rise occurred it would not be likely to go beyond 8.2. This should mean very stable conditions can be maintained.

Hope that helps