laurence92 laurence92
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  • Posted on: 22/6/2010 10:25
Aquarium safe paint? #1
I've just finished building a plywood canopy for my small aquarium. it looks a bit messy and i want to paint it to make it look a bit more like natural wood...

can anyone give me a UK brand of paint that is safe for use on it? i tried on a US forum but they recommended me something that they don't sell over here.

The canopy wont be in direct contact with the water, the inside will probably be exposed to some condensation though.

Basically i need an aquarium safe paint, and if possible a clear coat kind of thing that i can put in the inside to stop the wood absorbing the condensation. all input is appreciated, thanks.
EagleC EagleC
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  • Posted on: 22/6/2010 10:44
Re: Aquarium safe paint? #2
Polyurethane varnish should be completely inert once cured. Prep the wood well then paint and varnish and everything should be fine. Although prolonged direct contact with the water should be avoided the odd drip from condensation will be ok.

Previously I have coated the inside of a DIY wood with tin foil wallpapered on with PVA glue. This held up well and acts as a reflective surface for lighting.
laurence92 laurence92
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  • Posted on: 22/6/2010 10:49
Re: Aquarium safe paint? #3
Thanks for the info! after posting this i had just been told about the polyurethane varnish, and i had some offcuts from the build left outside that i had put a few coats of spray paint on yesterday to see how it looked. i just put a coat of varnish on it as a test.

just want to clear a few things up as im afraid know almost nothing about working with wood.

1. you said prep the wood before painting, i assume this means sanding it down to prime it for the paint to stick on?

2. the other thing was you said it will be inert once 'cured' am i right in thinking this just means allowing it to dry?

thanks very much for the help.
EagleC EagleC
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  • Posted on: 22/6/2010 11:01
Re: Aquarium safe paint? #4
1. Yes, sanded, cleaned, primed just the usual really. Seems obvious but certain people I know have just opened the tin and splashed paint on greasy wooden kitchen doors and then been surprised as it flakes off all over the place for the following months!

2. Cured is fully dry yes. Paint is often touch dry in a few minutes or hours but that's just the surface. Enough to put a second coat on perhaps but not dry right through so it can be easily damaged and is still changing chemically. Curing takes from 24 hours upwards depending on the paint type and atmospheric conditions. Personally I'd leave it about a week.
laurence92 laurence92
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  • Posted on: 22/6/2010 11:14
Re: Aquarium safe paint? #5
thanks alot for the help mate
Anonymous  
Re: Aquarium safe paint? #6
Most, if not all, liquid acrylics are also non-toxic and water resistant once dry - they'll also soak into permiable surfaces and help keep water out.