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EagleC EagleC
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  • Posted on: 2/4/2009 10:07
Re: Swimbladder Answers #71
Quote:

Coralline wrote:
hi lessa,
sorry to hear freddy is still having trouble. the most humane way to eutahnise a fish, is to put him in a smaller volume of water and add clove oil (anaethesthic) until fishy falls asleep, then add some vodka to the water, which is what will actually do the job. clove oil wont do it on its own, but dont add the vodka till fishy has gone to sleep.

whether its the right thing to do can only be decided by you, you have to decide whether he has enough quality of life, and it sounds like you dont think he has. it also sounds like you have done everything possible to try and make life more comfortable for him. if theres little chance of him recovering, it may be the kindest thing to do.
hope that helps


just a side note on the clove oil technique, it is very important the clove oil is mixed with water into an emulsion before adding to the fishes water. (Place a few drops of clove oil into a test tube, half fill with water and then shake well. Then drip this mix into the fishes water to put him to sleep.)
lessaone lessaone
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  • Posted on: 3/4/2009 4:26
Re: Swimbladder Answers #72
Thank you so much for the reply and suggestions, Coralline. I really appreciate it.

To show you how dumb I am: What is clove oil? Where would I find it?

And does it have to be vodka? I have no alcohol at all, but my daughter has wine. Would that do?

I dread having to do this, but if he's hurting, I must. I've let it go on for months, hoping not to have to.

<>lessa<>
cathie cathie
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  • Posted on: 3/4/2009 7:40
Re: Swimbladder Answers #73
You should be able to get clove oil from pharmacy, it is often sold as a remedy for toothache.
I don't think wine would do, the alcohol content would be too low, the alternative is to use more clove oil.
[url=http://www.bigfishcam
Anonymous  
Re: Swimbladder Answers #74
Goldfish are bred for shallow ponds with plenty of surface area. Aquariums are designed for tropical fish, not goldfish.

Goldfish that exhibit uncontrolled swimming; flipping over, or floating issues may be affected from the volume of water weight above it. Before medicating, try lowering the water table in your tank until the goldfish is able to right itself. Less depth, more surface area is what these affected goldfish need. Quite simple really.

Some goldfish are more sensitive than others and prone to flipping over while others remain unaffected.

Increasing surface action is also beneficial.

See my article on 'Floating Disorders'
[linked deleted by admin due to poor information]
Best of luck, Venus
lessaone lessaone
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  • Posted on: 27/4/2009 0:16
Re: Swimbladder Answers #75
Thanks, Venus. Your was a timely message for me, because Freddy hasn't improved, and when I got everything ready, a few weeks ago, I just couldn't do it.

So I'll try to shallow water thing. I didn't know that. I'll get back if that helps him. Thanks again.
TetraLinz TetraLinz
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  • Posted on: 27/4/2009 5:52
Re: Swimbladder Answers #76
Thank you for your input Venus and, I must confess I don't know much about ponds, but surely they have to be a certain depth to avoid freezing over during the winter months? I could be wrong, but surely that depth is around 2ft? Plus, presumably the deeper the pond, the better it is for the fish during the winter so that they're not stuck directly under an ice sheet.

You seem to be hung up on the idea that all problems regarding bouyancy are directly related to the water pressure, then you tell us that goldfish are designed to be kept in ponds. Presumably ponds are going to be more pressurized than aquaria because of the volume of water (and that fact that ponds have to be a certain depth).

The deeper the volume of water, the more pressure present, but the pressure difference in aquaria must be tiny!!! Plus, lowering the water level obviously means less water body, therefore potentially allowing toxin build-up.
T.L
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longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 27/4/2009 5:57
Re: Swimbladder Answers #77
Just to let you know, that goldfish emergency site is terrible, and its quotes about the water pressure affecting the goldfish as a reason for swimbladder failure are entirely skewed thinking. Its a bit like saying a runny nose is down to having water in the air, istead of your body purging and being enflamed and going into hyperproduction of mucous in response to a pathogen, its completely insane.

Once the bladder is damaged the fish my show temporary improvement in shallower water, but its not a cure, or even a real help, and the vulnerability to pressure in any event could only ever occur when the organ has already recieved damage way beyond the remit of merely breeder standard.

Moreover it also misleads people away from the real causes, such as bacterial sickness, poor water quality, and organ compression. I consider the information on much of that site actually harmful to fish health. If this ridiculous belief of yours were ever to catch on even more goldfish would live in reduced water volumes actually exaccerbating the problem, causing higher incidences of it in fish that might otherwise never have a symptom, not relieving it.

Venus, is there any chance we could stop linking people to it being that it is utter twaddle, and that you only post to promote your own stupid site? Your really ought to be more responsible than to be spreading this rubbish about.

Goldfish emergency 911 is without a doubt one of the most nicely presented and badly researched sites I have ever seen, thus it is a dangerous thing.

Actually linz many ponds are recommended to be 3 ft deep or so, helps protect the fish from the rigours of colder winters and over heating in summer. Fancy goldfish cant take the thermic shock of ponds , but a normal comet could live in a lake 30 feet deep if it wanted, freely using all available depth as it desires for foraging command. The whole water pressure in the aquarium thing is a complete myth.
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lessaone lessaone
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  • Posted on: 27/4/2009 7:17
Re: Swimbladder Answers #78
Hi, Longhaired and TetraLinz, and thank you.

Here's what I would like to know, from you knowledgeable folks!

It's been over a year. My grandkids brought Freddy home from a pet store. If he'd stayed with them in their kitchen, he'd have been dead in a month.

So I adopted him and have managed to keep him alive.

I don't know anything about fish. I don't know if he's suffering or if he's happy. Contented.

If he were a cat or a dog (both of which I know quite a lot about), I'd know if they were in pain, or suffering. I'd know what to do (and have done it several times over).

He lies on the bottom on his side, sometimes truly motionless with barely visible "breathing." The only thing that activates him is when he feels food pellets on his body. He then acts excited, eats every bit, dashing around upside down or on his side or on end.

He never ever swims normally.

Is that enough of a life for a fish? I just can't tell. If he is *hurting*, or miserable, I want to end it, of course. But if he is oblivious to his plight and doesn't even know it's a "plight," and is "happy," I'd let him be.

Thanks so much, all of you.

<>lessa<>
TetraLinz TetraLinz
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  • Posted on: 27/4/2009 19:32
Re: Swimbladder Answers #79
Doesn't sound like much of a life, being stuck on his side all day, barely moving except for food He'll know it's not natural for him to be lying on his side.

Maybe LH will be able to suggest something that can help him, but it doesn't look hopeful to me. Perhaps wait for LH to get back before making any final decisions.

Euthanising a fish is a hard thing to do - I've had to do so a few times now, and it's never easy.
T.L
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diadeb20 diadeb20
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  • Posted on: 4/6/2009 18:23
Re: Swimbladder Answers #80
I didn't know whether to post here or on a new thread so here goes. I have a seven year old goldfish (fancy I believe) which has become ill with what seems to be a swim bladder problem. Having read all the previous replies, it is clear that it is in too small a tank (a 30 litre bi-orb), but until I can acquire a larger tank, I want to try everything else possible.

The tank has a rock and a couple of plastic plants in it. I have been feeding him tetra fin floating food sticks once or sometimes twice a day. He has once had a growth on his head but I managed to cure that with some treatment.

A few weeks ago, he started staying at the bottom of the tank, float upside down and only occasionally swim. I tried a swimbladder treatment with some salt, but after three out of the four doses he was much worse and stopped feeding altogether. I gave him some peas and he has done an enormous poo. I have also done a partial water change. I have tested the water and the results are ammonia 0, nitrite 0, nitrate 250 and ph 7.6. The nitrate seems high but is that because there are no living plants in the tank? The growth on his head is reappearing and this time it is slightly black.

He is now lying on his side a lot and when he does try and swim he crash lands on the filter media at the bottom.

What can I do next? Thanks.