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paul1969 paul1969
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  • Posted on: 11/3/2009 7:50
Re: Tank Scratches #1
inside


paul1969 paul1969
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  • Posted on: 11/3/2009 7:48
Re: Sea Horses #2
Seahorse Care
Tank
A normal fish tank with filtration system. Internal powerhead filters are good, though choose a size appropriate for your particular tank. A suggested minimum size tank would be 40 litres, which will safely house two seahorses. However, a larger tank (e.g. 150 L) will allow you flexibility in interior design while giving your seahorses room to explore their new habitat. The larger your tank, the easier it is to maintain optimum water quality.

Substrate
If you plan on using an under-gravel filter, then you will need roughly 3-4cm of substrate in your tank. If you are using an internal powerhead filter or similar, substrate is really only for appearance, and is something for your seahorses to forage around in. In the case of the latter, a thin layer is recommended to reduce the need of stripping the tank periodically to clean the gravel. The choice of substrate is up to your own personal preference, but remember it is important that the particle size is not too small. Seahorses love to forage for food among the substrate, and small particles (such as sand or finely crushed coral) can be accidentally ingested.

Salt Water
Seahorses are salt-water fish. You can purchase marine salt in order to make up your own seawater with RO water. Please feel free to e-mail us for further advice on preparing your own salt water.

Temperature
Tropical Seahorses are happy to be kept between 23 - 25 degrees Celsius. This temperature is achieved by using a reliable heater-stat. Temperate Seahorses will be most content with a temperature between 16 - 20 degrees Celsius. There are several options to keep the water temperature safe:

* A generous tank volume, e.g. > 80 Litres
* Position the tank in a cool room
* Keep a supply of ice in the freezer. When days are warm, add as much ice as is needed to keep the temperature comfortable for your Seahorses. Do not be concerned about diluting the salinity.
* Invest in a chiller.
* 2 freezer bricks. Keep one in the freezer and one in the tank. Swap over each day or whenever is required.

Water Quality
It is important to carry out regular water tests for Ammonia, Nitrite, Nitrate and pH using a reliable test kit. We carry out a water change of 10% weekly but in the event of adverse test results an immediate change of 20% is recommended. The salinity should be kept stable at 1.022 and the pH at or close to 8.

Aquascaping
The way you decorate your tank can be as creative as you like, however, there are a few things to remember to ensure your Seahorses are happy and safe:

*Artifical Vegetation - not only can these look great, but Seahorses also love to hold onto them with their tails. Because of this, it is best to avoid spiky plastic plants.
*Corals - Even though tropical living corals are striking in appearance, they require minimum temperatures of 25 - 26 degrees Celsius. This is beyond the comfortable temperature for Sub-tropical and temperature Seahorses.
*Algae - There are various different marine algae available, these can provide for a stunning display in their own right and your Seahorses will love this particular environment.

Food
Our captive-bred seahorses have been trained to eat frozen food in particular mysid shrimp which have excellent nutritional value.

Give your Seahorses two (or more) small feeds each day. Individual Seahorses have different appetites, so begin with small amounts and wait until it is all eaten before adding more. You will soon get a feel for how much food they need. Break/cut the desired amount and put it in the tank frozen. As it defrosts, the individual shrimp float slowly to the bottom though it will usually be eaten before it gets that far. If you have companion fish in your aquarium, it is a good idea to defrost the food and target feed your Seahorses using a turkey baster to ensure they receive the food.

As with all aquarium fish, all uneaten food should be removed to avoid pollution.

Other Fish & Cleaning Crews
Great tank companions include Cleaner Shrimps, Fire Shrimps and Turbo Snails. There are several fish that will make ideal companions such as Scooter Blennies, Mandarin Fish and Gobies. If you are not sure which fish are suitable, e-mail us and we will gladly help.


paul1969 paul1969
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  • Posted on: 10/3/2009 20:42
Tank Scratches #3
does anyone know how to get rid of scratches on a reef tank glass,or is there anything that can be used???


paul1969 paul1969
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  • Posted on: 10/3/2009 18:09
Re: Sea Horses #4
Seahorses are fairly easy to keep the main problem is feeding as you need to put alot of food in as they cannot swim fast which causes lot of uneaten food which does not help the cycle in the tank.I kept seahorses for over 3 years and got hemm to breed.The best people for this is
www.simplyseahorses.co.uk


paul1969 paul1969
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  • Posted on: 9/3/2009 20:16
coral banded shrimp #5
i have a pair of coral banded shrimps,how can i tell if they have eggs,has anyone got pics to show this?


paul1969 paul1969
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  • Posted on: 4/3/2009 17:45
Deep Red Substrate #6
I keep getting a deep red layer on my marine tank substrate all corals and fish are fine but dont know how to get rid of it?


paul1969 paul1969
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  • Posted on: 3/3/2009 15:05
Re: Marine Lighting #7
my tank is a Juwel 450L bow front 5ft long 2 feet deep 2 feet high


paul1969 paul1969
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  • Posted on: 3/3/2009 7:11
Marine Lighting #8
I have 2 250w halide lights for my reef system,can someone please tell me what the best Kelvin is ?10,000/14,000,20,000