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Iain_clark Iain_clark
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  • Posted on: 31/12/2014 16:01
Re: Advice on best pond filtration #1
Apologies for the belated reply, haven't been on here for a while.

CB3100 - I have only 6 Koi (about 16")in the pond the remainder of the fish (say about 120 No.) are mixed Goldfish varying in size from very small to about 9".

I will certainly research the Oase filters (though probably the 18 rather than the 36), the idea of only needing 15minutes cleaning every 2 - 3 weeks sounds great! Whilst Oase are an expensive brand I have always found there products to be very good quality and worth the extra investment.

The reason that my filter 2 is a pressurised unit is for the need to hide it as the water feature which it feeds is in the middle of the pond and about 1.5 M high. Changing my filter 1 set-up for the Oase and keeping filter 2 as it currently is could be a good compromise.

Many thanks for your response.

Iain


Iain_clark Iain_clark
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  • Posted on: 6/10/2014 15:11
Advice on best pond filtration #2
Hi,
I've had ponds for many years and have always built my own filters, my question is are there filters available on the market which do as good a job and are less time consuming to maintain? My issue is that I'm away from home a lot with work and it isn't always easy to find an hour and a half spare time per week to clean out my filter set-up.

My pond approx volume is 3500 gallons (16,000L), it is located in full sun and is sort of a figure of eight shape with a bridge across the narrower middle section. There are two filter systems each powered by an Oase 6000L/Hr pump.

Filter 1 - At the left hand end of the pond is a waterfall, to get to the top of the fall the water is pushed through a 30W UV filter, a 40 gallon container containing brushes, a 25 gallon water tank which is completely filled with sponges (about 15 No.)and then two 40 gallon water Butts each holding 50 - 75 Litres of Kaldness K1.

Filter 2 - In the centre of the right hand circle of the pond I have a mountain feature (approx 1.5M high)into the top of which I have fitted a foam effect nozzle (so foaming water spews out of the top of the mountain, run's down the sides and into the pond). Water going to this feature passes through a Bioforce 12000 UV pressure filter.

Cleaning these filters every week (during the times of year when the fish are feeding) ensures perfect quality water which is absolutely clear, but it does take a lot of effort and time that I don't always have to wash though all of the sponges. Is there a more advanced solution to the particle filtration that is much more easily maintained than foams?


Iain_clark Iain_clark
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  • Posted on: 5/11/2013 19:54
Re: automatic pond feeder #3
DundeeJamie,
I have used the Cloverleaf feeder for the last couple of years, it's big enough to hold food for a couple of weeks for my pond (120 - 150 fish)and is controlled by a simple plug-in electric timer so you can set it for several small feeds per day.

http://www.swelluk.com/pond/feeders-1 ... OHC5Za1zroCFSXItAodzyQAZw

Hope that helps.

Iain


Iain_clark Iain_clark
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  • Posted on: 20/8/2013 13:51
Re: Misty water #4
Paul,
I've had similar problems with water clarrity this year which I've put down to the unusually high temperatures and high hours of direct sunlight.

Iain


Iain_clark Iain_clark
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  • Posted on: 11/1/2013 12:51
Re: Flexible (or not) hoses #5
They have gone completelly rigid, if you bend them just a little they just snap!


Iain_clark Iain_clark
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  • Posted on: 8/1/2013 20:43
Flexible (or not) hoses #6
Has anybody other than me had a problem with the newer style anti-kink hoses? mine are about 5 years old and the plastic has gone rigid and very fragile. Just lifting the hose a few inches caused it to collapse under it's own weight.

The older style thick wall hoses seem fine but the newer style which has a plastic coil strengthening the hose wall just don't seem fit for purpose. The hose couldn't be affected by UV and the whole length has failed, part under water, part underneath solid stone and part above ground hidden behind a wall.

I expected the hose to have a similar lifespan to the pond liner so had built it in under a waterfall. It took me many hours over the weekend breaking out the sides of the Waterfall to route a replacement host through!

Iain


Iain_clark Iain_clark
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  • Posted on: 21/5/2012 16:56
Re: depth support #7
Zoe,
A few things to think about:-
1) will the brickwork be seen when finished? if not then you can use concrete blocks rather than bricks which is cheaper and faster.
2) When you build a brick wall you normally build it in the middle of a concrete footing, but you need to think about how this will effect your design. If you want the pond to have fairly straight sides then you will need to draw this to show your builder/bricklayer so that he builds it right. The other alternative is to incorporate the concrete footing into a planting shelf.
3) plan carefully how your cables and pipes will pass through the brickwork.

Hope that helps.

Iain


Iain_clark Iain_clark
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  • Posted on: 18/5/2012 13:19
Re: depth support #8
Hi Zoe,
I'm afraid there is no simple answer to that question as it depends entirely on the ground conditions and the ground water table level.

I assume that you are intending to use a pvc or butyl Pond liner and want the sides of the new pond to be bare earth?

That may well be fine particularily as you are intending to slope the sides, but it does depend entirely on the type of ground and water table. My pond is approx 1200mm deep with 'earth' sides as I think you are intending.

A couple of things to be mindfull of:-
1) If your ground water table level is high then you may need a concrete base and brick sides to keep the ground water out (ground water can lift the liner).
2) If you are close to any trees or large shrubs you may need brick sides to stop the roots bursting through the liner.

Best thing to do is to dig a trial hole where the pond is going, and to the same depth or more, and leave it for a couple of days. If the sides of the hole don't fall in then the soil type should be OK and if the hole doesn't fill with water then you shouldn't have a problem with ground water.

One last point, remember that ponds can go up as well as down. Could you use some of the soil from the excavation to raise the ground level in the pond area so you don't need to dig as deep or take as much spoil away?

Regards

Iain


Iain_clark Iain_clark
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  • Posted on: 12/3/2012 22:07
Re: Frustrated planning pond #9
llVeXXll
The reason why you will have to reinforce the corners is because of the shape that you are planning. A right angle corner is no problem because the bricks are rectangular and the brick bond stays intact (as you get on the corner of a house). The other two corners of your triangular design are different though as they are not right angles and you loose all the strengh of the brick bond. Try this for yourself and you will see what I mean, childrens lego bricks would be ideal or any other similar blocks. You will find that you can build the right hand corner easily but not the other two corners of the triangle.

The other part of your thread is about the cost of the design. Whilst in the ideal world you would go for the best design and quality, most people have a budget that they need to work within. What you are proposing is a relatively small pond in which you intend to keep a smallish number of fish. You are not building densely populated Koi pond and don't need to build to that standard.

Incorporating a bottom drain into the pond does make it easier to clean out but is an expensive option which isn't essential. My pond is 3500 gallons and doesn't have a bottom drain. Without having the bottom drain you won't need a concrete bottom (unless you have a problem with very high ground water or very poor ground conditions) and will make substantial savings on pipes and fittings.

The location of the pond in your garden can also make a difference to cost. I'm guessing from your posts that you are not too hot on the DIY front so think about where the nearest electricity is (most pumps have a 10M cable so if the pond is within a few metre of a building with an electricity supply then there is no electrical work required. Also think about where the drainage is for overflows etc.

The key thing is to fully design the pond on paper, don't start digging a hole and then try to make it work.

Hope you haven't been put off the whole idea.

Regards

iain


Iain_clark Iain_clark
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  • Posted on: 6/3/2012 22:22
Re: Frustrated planning pond #10
Hi 11VeXX11,
Just a word of caution about your proposed pond shape that you should think about before commiting yourself.

How do you expect the corners of your raised triangular brickwork to look? Assuming that you want to achieve a nice sharp corner then that can only be achieved by cutting the brick and having a straight verticle joint right on the corner. This is a very weak joint which would be liable to cracking if not designed and built correctly.

In a standard brick wall most of the strength in the masonry is a result of the brick 'bond' used, i.e. there are no straight vertical joints. If you want a sharp corner then you would have no choice but to use a straight joint in your outer skin of brickwork and only achieve a limited bond (because of the angled corner) on your inner skin.

To overcome this problem you will need to insist that the corner joints are reinforced. On a small project like yours this isn't difficult or very expensive, but without it the joint will crack a few Months after it has been built. What you need is a product called 'bricktor', this is a stainless steel mesh which is laid across the open joint and bedded in the mortar at eack course of bricks and can be bought from any builders merchants.

Regards

Iain



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