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Crunchie Crunchie
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  • Posted on: 17/9/2017 19:30
Re: Poorly shub #1
Water parameters at the pond are ok but we're finding them harder to maintain in the tub. We wondered if perhaps Rosie was depressed at being on her own so brought a smaller fish home from the pond to keep her company. We also bought a smaller size sinking pellet which she loves (they are fed floating pellets at the pond). We're not sure what's caused it but Rosie seems to be a lot better and is swimming around now.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=iNI59_DcpSA

Ammonia is beginning to creep up even with daily 30% water changes so we'll maybe take her back to the pond this week to see how she gets on.


Crunchie Crunchie
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  • Posted on: 10/9/2017 18:37
Poorly shub #2
We bought our shubunkin Rosie in 2004 and for her first few years she lived in a 4' aquarium. In 2010 Rosie and the two boys she lived with spawned and we re-homed them and their babies to an indoor pond which I now maintain.

A week or so ago someone at the pond buildings told me that Rosie was looking unwell. When i arrived she was floating around on her side so I brought her home and housed her in a 145l storage tub as this was the biggest thing I had. For the first few days I had to hold her and let food drift right in front of her mouth.

I have an established tank for my axolotls so borrowed half of their filter sponge. She has a Fluval 2 plus in the box and eats quite enthusiastically (blood worm and shelled pea) but otherwise she just sits on the bottom. I've treated the water with aquarium salts but I'm unsure what else I could try. I'm half tempted to ring my vet to see if they can help. We've taken goldfish to them before but they weren't in as bad condition. I might ring them tomorrow to see if they'd give me anything without me having to bring her in as I think she'd really struggle with a car journey.

She does look really skinny and I'm pretty sure she's totally blind but we've had blind goldies before that coped OK.

I bought some melafix but that seemed to make her worse if anything (she started lying on her side rather than upright). We changed the water about 24 hours after adding the melafix.

Just as a reference Rosie is on the far right of this photo which I took in August. Their pond is around 1200 gallons with around 15-20 goldfish in it. It has a big laguna filter and is fed by the a mains tap which runs through a carbon filter.

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Crunchie Crunchie
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  • Posted on: 23/5/2014 14:22
Re: Aggressive Fantails #3
We had our goldies spawn in 2010, by 2012 the baby boys started to develop tubercles. Randy little gits! Whenever our goldies have spawned we've always found that an increase in space and/or a water temperature change has brought it on.


Crunchie Crunchie
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  • Posted on: 22/5/2014 14:19
Re: good quality goldfish food #4
These are single-tailed pond goldies I have. I guess the food might still be suitable for them though?


Crunchie Crunchie
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  • Posted on: 22/5/2014 7:32
good quality goldfish food #5
I used to get a food from our local garden centre but they've stopped doing it so I'm looking online. I was hoping folk would share their opinions on what's the best quality gold fish food? They get frozen food along with shelled peas but we still need a pellet food.


Crunchie Crunchie
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  • Posted on: 13/7/2013 20:36
Re: Filter/pump combo for an indoor goldie pond? #6
Thanks for the advice 2010!

It would be easier to to have two of everything, two filters two pumps.

Unfortunately there's only one electric outlet anywhere near the pond.

You could run a pipe all round the pool floor with holes in the pipe to act as inlets, these would then suck all the debris in keeping the floor clean. But where would you put the holes, what size, how many, what size pump (Huge?) and how would you hide it all?

I imagine this could be possible but I can't imagine the owners will want us draining the pond again any time soon. It's a possibility for next year but as you say sounds like a hassle and a half.

Gravel is usually used to hide things (Unless its a gravel filter) But what ever the reason for its use it still needs cleaning, and having to remove several tonnes of gravel to clean it is no mean feat. (Trust me, I know)

At the minute the only gravel we're using is in the plant baskets and I'd rather keep it that way. At least with the tiles it's easy to hoover up all the muck with the pond-vac.

Its been poorly designed, it looks like it was designed by an architect who had no idea of how ponds and fountains work, there is no water inlet or outlet, no cable inlet for a pump (Fountain)

It does actually have a tap right at the back which we've attached a carbon filter to so that it can remain on. There's an overflow drain hidden as well so there's a fair bit of water replaced every day. To give you an idea the tap on its own filled the pond within 24 hours but the carbon filter reduces its flow somewhat.

There was also a wire under all the rocks which is visible in the 3rd picture, it used to power a fountain in the middle of the pond but hasn't been used in years.

I actually really like it. (But obviously if it were mine I would make a few alterations, and not what you think)

I actually like it a lot as well, there are 22 goldies in there just now and they all seem quite healthy. 7 of them are the offspring of 3 of my own fish so they all live in it with their mother. Unfortunately the two father fish died before we took over the maintenance.

The fish went back in yesterday so here's a little video we took today.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3OnZrKFFaDs&feature=youtu.be


Crunchie Crunchie
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  • Posted on: 11/7/2013 15:20
Filter/pump combo for an indoor goldie pond? #7
Myself and my partner took over the maintenance of an indoor goldfish pond a year or two ago.

Between one thing and another we were never able to get in and completely gut the pond until now. The water levels were all fine, the fish were healthy and we hoovered the bottom with an Oase pond vac every month or so.

The guys that maintained the pond before us have put in a Langua pressure-flo filter (though can't remember the size) and a pump that's a brand I've never heard of. Unfortunately I forgot to lift the note I made of the filter and pump make.

Over today and tomorrow we're gutting the pond, replacing two of the filter sponges, lifting as much of the gunk from the floor of the tank as possible, scrabbing off as much algae as we can from the tiles, draining and re-filling the pond.

For some reason the guys that did the pond before us put in a load of rocks on the bottom. These acted as a horrendous mud trap as you can see...

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This was how much they'd put in and the photo was taken just after we'd started draining so it looks a bit cloudy but the water was actually crystal (we had to remove some to keep the fish in).

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This is what the pond currently looks like but I have a couple of questions.

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I assume we'd be best to leave it as a bare tile floor now? We have kept a few of the rocks but could create a "gravel corner" with these if the fish need gravel.

Is there a better type of filter/pump combo we'd maybe be able to invest in that might be better suited to the pond? There was a lot of gunk collecting in the corners where the stepping stone type things are. we were wondering if there might be a filter with two inlets that we could maybe attach two pumps to?

The pond is roughly 1500 gallons.


Crunchie Crunchie
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  • Posted on: 19/2/2012 12:22
Re: temperate tank #8
Thankfully she has been given that advice already. The goldies and HSL are currently in a 40l tank. The hillstream was going to be put in an 80l tank along with WCMM but I'm not sure what's to happen with the goldies.


Crunchie Crunchie
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  • Posted on: 19/2/2012 11:12
Re: temperate tank #9
Unfortunately the HSL was an impluse buy from PAH and is currently residing in a small tank (unsure of size or capacity) with 2 fancy goldfish. The 80 litres tank is one which has been bought on ebay so any algae or bacteria present in it will likely die off before the fish go in.

I'm not sure what she wants to do with the goldfish but I have advised that a 48" length tank would be the minimum they would require. I've also said that if she could get some smooth rocks with algae on from another aquarium this would be good for the HSL.

I think it's just a typical case of someone being offered poor advice from PAH and possibly other places as well.


Crunchie Crunchie
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  • Posted on: 19/2/2012 10:46
temperate tank #10
I've got a member of another forum asking whether she could keep WCMM's and platys in with a hillstream loach. There aren't many fish keepers on the forum and so I feel she isn't getting a great many replies.

I've advised that hillstream loaches need fast flowing water which wouldn't be appreciated much by the platys (not sure if I'm wrong but I was under the impression platys prefer slow moving water).

Ideally she wasnts 3 minnows, 3 platys and three hillstream loaches for an 80 litre tank. I have advised her to get 6 minnows and leave the platys out as the tank will be unheated and 3 minnows don't represent a shoal.

Would this be the correct advice would you say or is it possible to do wants without there being welfare issues? I just don't want to be the lone voice telling her she can't do this or that.



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