Bottom



nathangoudie nathangoudie
  • Home away from home
  • Home away from home
  • Posted on: 8/2 12:25
Re: Suggestion on mid-dweller softwater fish that can tolerate "decent" flow? #1
I just had a look on them.

Honestly they are not very appealing to me and they are not easily available in my country.

I guess my tank is too warm for most of fast-moving fish?


nathangoudie nathangoudie
  • Home away from home
  • Home away from home
  • Posted on: 4/2 0:03
Re: Tank too clean ? #2
Hello
What kind of filtration are you using?

It sounds like you somehow crashed the bacteria colony. Best bet is to find some established filter media to kick start again. Or i have found thr probidio product (biodigest + biotrace) are very useful for jump start.


nathangoudie nathangoudie
  • Home away from home
  • Home away from home
  • Posted on: 3/2 23:58
Re: Suggestion on mid-dweller softwater fish that can tolerate "decent" flow? #3
Yea..... i feel like theres no such suitable fish.... at least not that im aware of.
3000l/hr is not that strong from mid to end of the tank but still it'd be better to have strong swimmers


nathangoudie nathangoudie
  • Home away from home
  • Home away from home
  • Posted on: 3/2 2:07
Suggestion on mid-dweller softwater fish that can tolerate "decent" flow? #4
Hi all, it's been a while

So finally i've set up my 170x50x60 tank with fast moving - blackwater style.

The tank has a huge piece of wood and thick sand bottom with plants mainly attached to the wood. Flow rate is something like 2500-3000l/hr

The tank is meant for some pleco but Im not adding any pleco yet until the tank and vegetation mature.

So far Im having 10 bronze cory and Im planning to get some more kind of cory. However, the mid level of the tank is really empty now and Im not sure neon or rummy nose can tolerate this kind of flow....

The parameter is:
Temp 27C
gH and kH is 1-3degree (Pretty soft water)

Any suggestion is welcome! I don't like something too big though


nathangoudie nathangoudie
  • Home away from home
  • Home away from home
  • Posted on: 28/8/2018 1:23
Re: Fish Tank Size Help #5
Hi,

People are right, your tank is too small. Those fish grow really fast and can grow really big (You don't see those giantic fish often because most of the time they don't receive proper care and die before growing to full potential size)

For all goldfish type, they need to have food almost constantly. So feeding little is not proper care to be honest. They only seem fine because they are hungry and go crazily active when they see you as potentially they will have food.

If you really want to measure the long term health of your fish.... If you've been keeping them for 1 year, they should have been much bigger than they currently are
http://injaf.org/articles-guides/youn ... hild-friendly-fish-tanks/


nathangoudie nathangoudie
  • Home away from home
  • Home away from home
  • Posted on: 3/8/2018 10:55
Re: White foam on garden pond #6
Yes it's true that too much protein can be the cause (Basically it means too much nitrogen).

Just test for NO2, NO3 and NH3 - High level of any of these substance can cause foam/bubble like in the water surface.

But since you are also using chemicals/medicine in your pond, this can also be the reason.


nathangoudie nathangoudie
  • Home away from home
  • Home away from home
  • Posted on: 3/8/2018 1:14
Re: Pond fish dying #7
Hello,

What is the test kit you are using?

Really sorry to hear the losses of your fish and the spending on the chemicals.

I may be a bit wordy but I hope this will help you understand the basic around using chemicals and fish health.

1. Health
Like human and any other animals - Fish immune system can be very strong and fight off many sickness/bacteria on its own - The only thing that does the immune system cannot fight off is mostly parasites (Though sometimes they can mitigate them by promoting slime coat). Or some really serious virus/infection.

So how to promote immune system? Just like human, they need:
- Good nutrient
- Clean and healthy environment (Basically proper filtration and established beneficial bacteria colony in the pond ecosystem)
- Stress-free!!!!!

Moving, catching the fish cause seriously stress unless you did it professionally and swiftly. And this kind of stress is a big culprit that actually kill many fish! Even for big fish like koi!! (I have some experience in rearing and selling koi and transporting is a big issue).

2. Chemicals / Medicine
Manganate bath is pretty popular and it's so far seem to be effective in treating parasite (And probably the cheapest method). However, giving them bath in smaller tank/containers with proper fish medicine is my much much prefered method (Usually I use medicine from API brand, both general cure and parasite cure would work depending on your purpose and your parasite).
====>>> Why I don't like manganate bath??? --> Manganate is a strong oxidize chemical, even we human use to disinfect wounds and it's super effective at killing microbes or simple organism. So basically you are dipping the whole fish in a oxidization solution and hoping that the oxidization process kill off all parasites/bacteria (simple organism) before it gets to your fish tissue. Long bath is not good at all and cause serious stress, basically just imagine you have manganate in your organs.

Other proper fish medicine instead of using oxidization, actually use proper chemicals that kill off the targeted parasite/bacteria. Without causing problem to the fish.

Now back to the method you are doing.
- M Fluke kill flukes but it also kill the beneficial bacteria that convert Ammonia to Nitrate. You can google "Nitrogen Cycle" if you don't know what I mean.

- M fluke is a chemical, most chemicals do not react to UV light so turning off does not affect the effectiveness of the chemical. Also I think you should have UV light on as UV light can kill parasite/bacteria.

- Parasites may and may not kill fish. They usually kill fish when they reproduce so fast that they overtake vital organs such as gills, guts,..... Or they cause open wounds that later get infected (Fish with strong immune system don't get infected that easily though). So unless you found parasites in the gills of your dead fish (or guts or open wound) then I doubt parasite is the culprit.

My suspicion would be constant water changes + catching and bathing that cause water shock and stress the fish.


nathangoudie nathangoudie
  • Home away from home
  • Home away from home
  • Posted on: 2/8/2018 14:19
Re: Pond fish dying #8
Hello,

Do you know what is the parasite you saw? Its very hard to treat parasite in a 6000l pond just by adding chemicals. Also chemicals that kill parasites will also kill beneficial bacteria --> Ammonia spikes.

My suggestion -
Test ammonia again (It's likely to be high now) - Anything higher than 0.5ppm is no good.
=> If ammonia is high then do water change -> Go buy some bacteria products (It might be expensive in your area) or Go find someone with established filter and ask for some media.

Identify the parasite you saw -> Also see if parasite exists in recently dead fish.

Increase water movement (basically increase areation in the water) -> I found koi and such species are healthier in flowing water

Also how many fish do you have in your pond?


nathangoudie nathangoudie
  • Home away from home
  • Home away from home
  • Posted on: 25/7/2018 2:26
Re: Discuss never successful bred in community? #9
Some updates FYI.

I didn't have time to set up the tank divider but after countless time they lay eggs. They finally managed to keep their fries alive!!!

For now I have managed to counted 5 discus babies with size of 05-1 cm now. I found 1 dead baby fish at the size too (Don't know why)

Though the number is not big but they finally mnage to do it by themselves. The babies are freely swimming and hunting for food now but they still mostly swim near parents.


nathangoudie nathangoudie
  • Home away from home
  • Home away from home
  • Posted on: 26/5/2018 4:11
Re: Discuss never successful bred in community? #10
@Fishlady:
yes yes that's what I meant but I had no idea what it is called :P
Anyway I will give it a try. My discus are literally laying eggs weekly now since it's raining season.

@Alysonpeaches:
Honestly I don't find them that hard to keep even though I know that they are famous for being picky.
I kept my tank basically outdoor and it takes all the rain water. I mostly only do water changes during dry season.
The lesson I learned when I first started (I did lost some fish) is that make sure you de-worm them and give them proper treatment to avoid long term healthy issue. And give them a big enough tank because they will grow fast.
After those lessons, I never lost any discus again!! (Well I did lost 1 more but it was due to jumping :( ). In my community tank, Cardinal tetra, GBRam casualty number is higher than anything else. Never found out why they died though...

I really believe that as long as you understand, do your homework and be gentle. All fish is fine. The biggest killer of discus is stress I think.



(1) 2 3 4 ... 136 »