Forum Index


Board index » All Posts (tugslike)

BottomBottom



tugslike tugslike
  • Just popping in
  • Just popping in
  • Posted on: 19/8/2012 7:45
Re: Cost for a built raised pond #1
Hi guys, isn't it funny how people take things literally sometimes (nothing personal 2010). What I was trying to illustrate was a ball park figure isn't achievable for the chaps build, as you said 2010, "too many variables". My message between the lines is shop around, I don't have a clue what deals or retailers he has at his disposal. If he needs to cut down on material costs i.e. block work, facing, slabs etc....think outside the box...look for old stock, over stock etc and take time finding deals. I don't know what the fellow is able to do himself as labour would boost the cost considerably (?15 - ?20+ hour here). If money was no object he wouldn't have posted on here. I was merely trying to ILLUSTRATE things can be achieved for less if one shops around and does as much on the labour front as one is capable of.


tugslike tugslike
  • Just popping in
  • Just popping in
  • Posted on: 11/8/2012 16:57
Re: Cost for a built raised pond #2
Hi, I built a raised pond 2.8m x 1.5m x 1m depth. I built it using 6, 4x4 posts concreted to a depth of 1' into compacted soil; the sides are 1" thick decking (2nds on offer from B&Q) all bolted together. Carpet laid on the base and a butyl liner that was on offer from Maidenhead aquatics. Butyl liner held in place by decking surround on top. 1.5" overflow drilled and secured. About 4,200 litres in total and it's been there for two years with no leaks. Okay, I built it myself and all electrics were available from my main pond. Total cost ?12 fence posts, ?42 decking, ?14 postcrete, ?0 old carpet, ?48 off cut butyl liner, bolts ?6....grand total ?122....get a diy guy to build it for you...I'm taking mine down as it's only housing 2 bullrushes that are being sold. Used to be a complete working fish pond though...

***As stated before, get a qualified electrician to instal supply***


tugslike tugslike
  • Just popping in
  • Just popping in
  • Posted on: 1/7/2012 15:31
Re: Help! My pond fish keep dying. #3
Wise words 2010 !!! When we started off pond exploration we got it wrong so many times and had to learn by all our mistakes. Finding the balance through a good pond system is key to ENJOYING your pond and keeping the fish as healthy as possible. We started off by having inadequate equipment thinking we could do it on the cheap...it cost more in the long run.


tugslike tugslike
  • Just popping in
  • Just popping in
  • Posted on: 1/7/2012 14:52
Re: Help, Dead Algae From UV #4
Hi, I have to agree with the other poster who said he didn't like all in one systems (we've had one, it's now sitting in the shed). When we first started pond exploration about six years ago, we started off far too small in every way equipment wise (and changed up about 4 times until we got it right about 3 years ago & wasted money in the process). I think the success to any good pond is...circulate the water more than you think you need, have the biggest and best filter system you can (buy second hand off Ebay etc, not new as they're a rip off, unless you've got some spare dosh ) and have a bigger UV system than you think you need, also, have air stones going. Hope you get the problem sorted as having a pond is beautiful and relaxing......when it's going well


tugslike tugslike
  • Just popping in
  • Just popping in
  • Posted on: 23/7/2011 19:04
Re: Pond Help, fish in-active #5
Hi Matt, that sounds more realistic for keeping fish. It would be nice to see some photos when you're done and I hope you enjoy the pond. Best wishes !


tugslike tugslike
  • Just popping in
  • Just popping in
  • Posted on: 22/7/2011 14:48
Re: Pond Help, fish in-active #6
Hi Matt, it sounds like the feature is way too shallow to keep fish!! As for the winter, our pond froze this year with 3" of ice and we have air pumps, 11,000lph pump and it's 4.5' deep. If it were possible, I'd make it deeper ASAP. If it's at all practical, I would make the whole pond larger and deeper than it is now if you're going to keep fish. If not, re-home the fish and just have it as a nice water feature?


tugslike tugslike
  • Just popping in
  • Just popping in
  • Posted on: 3/7/2011 7:06
Re: Making a bio filter #7
Thanks for putting me straight on that, I hadn't come across the term "Veggie" filter, cheers. The reason I want to do something along those lines is to make use of the raised pond and, I thought having a "veggie" type filter wouldn't be a negative thing? thanks for your info and feedback, very helpful.


tugslike tugslike
  • Just popping in
  • Just popping in
  • Posted on: 2/7/2011 19:38
Making a bio filter #8
Hi everyone, hope you're all enjoying the weather We're thinking of building a bio filter out of our raised pond and would like some advice if anyone has done similar or has some ideas to share. Our raised wooden pond has no fish in it. I was thinking of planting it up fairly thickly (with ideas please?) and a 6500 Lt per hour pump going from the big pond up hill one meter into the wooden pond where it would flow through the plants to the overflow back into the big pond. The big pond then has a 12,000 LTR pump going to a Saturn pre filter linked to a Trinamic filter with UV, which then goes back to the big pond. Do you think it's worth doing OR, could you think of a better way of doing it? Video to a link of our pond setup as of now. Thanks for possible help !!! pond


tugslike tugslike
  • Just popping in
  • Just popping in
  • Posted on: 2/7/2011 19:13
Re: GREEN WATER #9
Hi, how long have you had the pond established with the set up you have now? only ask to see if the water was clear for a long time before the problem arose. How did you clean the filter out and how often do you clean it? When we set our pond up years ago we went through 3 filter/pump systems getting bigger each time until we conquered the water problems. In our experience get a good LARGE filter system with a big flow rate pump in the first place and clean it REGULARLY. Our pond set up was far too small to cope with dirty water until we learned through experience. Hope this is some help? If your system was coping well before, i.e.: for a season or so; best to ask if something in the environment changed. Anyway, best wishes....Tugslike


tugslike tugslike
  • Just popping in
  • Just popping in
  • Posted on: 2/7/2011 8:23
Re: Overgrown #10
Hi, we're just about to cut back our plants too as they're expanding at a rate. I'm taking the view that what I leave will be plenty for the wildlife, especially in the shallows. I want to leave enough for cover but clear enough to observe the fish. It will re-establish very soon anyway. I suppose it depends on what you want your pond to be and what size it is, a wildlife pond only or decorative pond with plants etc ?



TopTop
(1) 2 »