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longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 23/4/2009 3:25
Re: SFF Biotope tank - update #41
Cool and groovy linz. Sorry I didnt reply to the mails, have been stupidy busy at the moment, and knackered, and also forgot to check my mail. Doing fine without me though obviously. One word of caution though, you'll be on the clock for one of the bettas eating the fry, you'll have to segregate, the will to protect them doesnt last long.

Actually that was dead quick, they hatch in around four days, and often they fall off the nest, did they hatch from bubbles or appear from substrate? Lucky they werent eaten. for future ref if needed and you get egg dropping and eating issues you can just jar the whole nest and move it to an aquarium, the fry dont need the parents to survive.

Bigger tank has done its job though. Free living free mating, fry survival, limited fighting even with two males. Even if they stayed in the tank and dont get eaten (not that I would push my luck on that) they would probably survive because there will be microfauna. As long as long as they stay away fropm the filter. Aquaballs are good and rarely suck up fry but some tights might be a sensible precaution.

You did want to shatter small betta tank culture didnt you?

Consider it job done. You have conclusively proved there is another way.




Seriously well done you. Wonder what colour they will turn out lol?

Next project, how many generations before wild betta type asserts itself, that should keep you busy a few years lol.

Ps , dont forget infusoria and daphnia too.
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longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 23/4/2009 3:16
Re: Fish doing Somersaults!!!??? PLEASE HELP! #42
Hexamitiasis sometimes hits the brain too. I assume your on top of the stats and have already sussed out stuff like thermic shock, photoshock electrical problems, and have sussed if the fish has taken a beating recently from another, cos frankly myxo is obviously around at the moment, seen it around in forums elsewhere too, and youve had recent fish aquisition, though I would like to know the species you brought in.

Pic of the fish can help, and have you seen any blackening scales, blanching fish, or any sensory pore enlargement on the pits of any of your fish, or any scratches, or trailing slime from the lateral line of any of the cichlids? Any white patches and circular lesions on the skin of any catfish such as synodontids?

Lastly what has the sick fish been eating for the last few months, (roughly in relative proportions of diet by percentage would be nice, but I know thats tricky to work out, but ballpark will do me) its a long shot but some neurological problems (cos thats what I suspect it is, be it parasitic or nutritional)can be caused by thiaminase and vitamin deficiency issues.

Odds on its probably going to be hexamitiasis or myxo, and the cure is the same, high dose metronidazole of a prolonged period for the entire community, but we'd better make sure all the ticks and crosses are in the right place before you do that because theres a cycle risk.

Also do you have a UV steriliser?
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longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 21/4/2009 20:35
Re: I am playing with my... #43
On lenses too, also consider the x2 multiplier barrels, they can increase magnification in both telephot and macro, but will drop the available light. Now they often cost as much as a macro lens anyway, but if you can find a decent one for cheap it could affect the way you view lens purchases, meaning better reesults on lesser graders of lens. For me at the moment it would be a false economy compared to the secondhand market for bigger lenses, but it depends what you can find out there.
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longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 21/4/2009 19:17
Re: I am playing with my... #44
Dazzler, if nikon prices scare youa bit (they do me lol) try sigma lenses, just as good really.

http://www.warehouseexpress.com/product/default.aspx?sku=1017944

Good supplier that site incidentally.

If you can, stretch to a 300 mm though, you might find a 200 mm a little short,especially if your used to digfital zoom of compacts and prosumers. I use my 300mm more than almost anything else.


On the macro the 50mm will be good.

http://www.warehouseexpress.com/categ ... ma+Lenses+for+Nikon+Exact


And of course dont forget the second hand market, ebay etc. This is a golden time where anti shake lenses are meaning people are upgrading, and spending more money which means they are putting non-IS lenses on the market much cheaper. A photographer with a steadier set of hands than the average shaky handed camara freak can really clean up here, building a solid non IS lens collection that will teach you a lot about photography and shooting techniques.


How do I see gloucester, well, lets face it, i'm a creature of the night, I'm very light sensitive and light describes form so I aim to use light more than a sense of line structure, then you break the rule of thirds composition a bit to add gravitas and hyperaccentuate what you pick out. I'm also not afraid to move around, back off, or lie on the floor to get the shot. Most photographers dont use anything other than standing position at middle distance. When you look at something, imagine you are mentally 3d mapping it, think about what position you would like to take from, and find a way to get there. Im also not afraid to change lenses for different depth of fields, backing off and using telephot gives a very different result to using a wide angle up close, it can bring things together allowing for more complex composition.

One thing ive also learned is to protect your eyes sensitivity before a shoot. On a sunny day or when going near traffic and glare, protect your eyes with shades, taking them off only to shoot, or when the contrasts dont glare you out. Let your eyes acclimate to your surrounding light level and you will see the world a different way. Shift your eyes focus to ranges , try to get three distance levels into a shot and consider all of them foir their composition. Look at immediate frontage, then middle distance and the object of furthest focus and use depth of field to get what you want, be that narrowe f settings for claustrophic shoots or multiple bracketed shots in the same position to build the images together in photoshop, or long exposures with maxed out f settings.


Then also try to isolate or work on relationships between texture and form, when you see differences and want to combine them, bring them together the way you want using a shot technique that defines the nature and the differences between objects as individually as you can, watch upper and lower ranges of depth of field and of exposure to maximum benefit. Dont be afraid to shoot off several picks from the same angle, reset focus in bracketing shots too, and have a review in the field to make sure the light you want is the light you get.
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longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 21/4/2009 5:20
Re: I am playing with my... #45
Not liking the look of that samsung too much, it looks sub prosumer category to me, more of a digital compact, or top end holiday snapper, despite the name attached to the lens it just wont be big enough for really good light capture, and when that little light hits the sensor, even at the high res it has it will have a hell of a lot of grain and it will force you to use higher end ISO. Its probably a mainstream model with the res tacked on as a selling point. With lenses that small its actually not really worth going much over 6 meg res anyway. There are i'm sure cameras with better lenses that shoot better pictures on a fraction of that res.

There has to be a decent synchronicity between sensor, chip, and lens, and the res. My stepdad buys cameras according to res, hes gone through about three now, and they were all pants because the lens was just too small. Huge not particularly clear pictures that take up gigabytes of space on the ol hard drive and not one a good one or anything that a 5-6 meg res camera couldnt take. You can only make up for so much digitally. A lot of folks dont realise you can compress images from cameras like these down a fifth of original file size and not see any noticeable degradement in picture quality. In some cases, bizarrely the picture can improve a little. Its all grain noise, and as soon as the lighting gets difficult you get hot or stuck pixels. In short the camera could have been 5 meg and you wouldnt have told the difference because the lens was always its major limitation, and getting light to the sensor is the problem, and this is not something fixed by high resolution.

I have to admit, every time I see a digital compact with more than 8 meg res I kind of wonder why it even exists. Its like a bunch of teenagers all with vauhall nova's, where the marker of excellence is to have a bigger exhasut pipe. No other engine mods, just the exhaust pipe.lol.

Personally I would go for one of the chunkier prosumer cameras, like the top of range powershots or the nikon equivalent, and look for a decent sized lens over the tiny. You see, you can probably buy a camera that will do the same job as that samsung for under 100 quid, and theres really no point in paying more than that. Save yourself all the wasted data and cardspace. Higher res does not always mean better pictures, and in this range of cameras its a keeping up with the joneses thing.

Its a bit like talking cars. Someone will kill themselves to buy a vauxhall astra thats modern and brand new thinking its special and will pay that extra 4 grand for the hotter engine, but if speed was really the game they could have gone and bought a second hand porsche for the same money.

Moral being look at the lens and the sensor, the res is actually a 3rd place runner in terms of what you need to take good pictures. My dslr is 12 meg and I really wouldnt need more pixels for anything except panoramic shots of cities, or model shots going to print in a big magazine or promo posters. 14 meg in a compact seems completely insane. The lens cannot possibly live up to the promises the res makes, its just wasted data.

Proof?

I took this years ago with a 4 meg res powershot A series.And its a crop to at least half size of original, and then it was shrunk to tiny by photobucket at the time which wouldnt take more than quarter meg pictures.

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I'll bet the lens in the a series and the samsung were comperable, but where would the other 10 res do any good? How much clearer could that picture be, and how much more could there be to see?
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longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 20/4/2009 11:34
Re: Fungal infection. How do I treat? #46
Doesnt need to specifically be a fish vet, places that deal with livestock, usually horses have it. Just about any vet should be able to help on that depending on mental willingness, beyond that its the net I guess. Be careful though, due to some possible problems in interpreting POMV legislation and small animal medicine laws its not clear to many if procuring furan 2 without veterinary cascade powers is legal. Wouldnt want anyone to fall foul of the law. Some livestock supply warehouses do have some cascade powers for farmers, so its worth giving them a try.

Water perams sound fine for goldfish, obviously a little soft on occassion, but nothing critical as long as nitrate stays under the 40.
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longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 20/4/2009 11:29
Re: Sudden change of water condition #47
I was wondering, how deep is pond?
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longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 20/4/2009 11:15
Re: Sudden change of water condition #48
Hydrogen sulphide disturbance, the mulm in the bottom of the pond is thick and has a large anaerobic bacterial culture poducing the gas, many ponds do. Hydrogen sulphide triggers algae blooms, and sometimes causes bacterial deaths which may also mist the water, affect filtration, and radically therefore increase co2 production a few days on as the yeasts take over from the usual bacterial cultures and depending on the level can also kill plants and fish. Sort of a "bloom and bust" phenomenon that happens when the pond is being destabilised by its own nutrient balance. Bottom of the pond might be due a major overhaul, possibly because the substrate contains too much non-depleted mulm which serves as a bed for OTT anaerobic growth.

Personally I would run a few huge airbombs and get some of the muck out of the bottom shifted.Unlucky to have run into it with a couple of the filters, but if the substrate seals over with slimes for a while and then gets disturbed by fish digging it will release toxic gases periodically, and one of the species you have is a major digger.

A long term silution is either more cleaning, or feed a bit less, and make sure garden waste and leaf litter stays out of the pond a bit more. Its a big pond, but on natures principles its unaturally heavily stocked with large species, and despite the filtration the substrate might need a higher, more frequent level of clean-up than your used to doing. Bottom line is you have large species, and plants and thats not quite representative of the natural stages of nutrient depletion. The waste in fish poo is still quite rich, and bacterial colonies move and expand to massively abnormal levels to fill the gap, and the side effect of that much bacteria is a hell of a lot of extra gas.

Natural bottom ponds only work with the truly large species when its understocked in a big way, when your filter reliant with big species and average to high stocking the bottom clearing becomes a bigger responsibility and has to be done much more often, especially with the intention to pre-empt blooms from seasons where the temperature takes some hikes, ie, spring.

You have two basic options with a pond and that kind of stocking, because in effect its becoming like an aquarium, you either keep the bottom pretty clean, or have species that incessantly disturb it, or barely disturb it at all. In your case the fish will go through bouts of digging and they are big enough to shift a lot of debris when they do. This kind of makes it the worst case scenario for toxic gas releases.

Even basketed off many plants will leach soils into the water and the fish do tear them up when trying to get the roots, and if the lilies have been fed with heavy fertiliser that could also contribute to algae blooming, and if its creating fine silt, then thats what will be sealing the substrate off from oxygen creating a barrier to o2 that anaerobic bacteria will enjoy. Might have to start looking at how substrate gets layered down in your pond.

There things you can do at home to take a look, almost like taking core saples, gently drive a glass down into the muck, slide something in over the bottom, and bring it up, and see how its layering, look for the really black layer, and the thickness of that and where its positioned, because that the area that hold the most bacteria.
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longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 20/4/2009 10:57
Re: Fungal infection. How do I treat? #49
Half moon lesions, redness trace septacaemia after a very fast growing fluff which then dies down a little, thats the standard pattern of infection, probably not of fungus but a tower bacterium, though they do look very similar initially. Given the frequency with which it tends to show up in the hobby, probably flavobacterium columnare. One for furan 2 or antibiotics from the vet. Do it quickly too, its quite a fast killer. Shop bought meds will only suppress it, and wont kill it at this stage, straight to the vet on this one really.
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longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 20/4/2009 10:34
Re: I am playing with my... #50
Does quite appeal to me, dead of night, churchyards and robed figures. Very hammer.lol

Its the same in gloucester about the clubbers, I head out at around 3am when most of the clubbers have got fatigue and the streets are clear. Night photography tends to be best after rain, combine that with 3-4 am and you don't find many people around, although the weird thing is if you hand aroung until 4 am what you find is the dog walkers starting to come out. Who the hell walks a dog at 4am? Thats what you call starting early!

Anyway, at slimbridge its duckling and gosling season for most. How are you supposed to resist?

Just say aaaawwwwww.lol

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...and then get out of the way quick,lol

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