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longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 26/4/2009 21:32
Re: Buggy sick, please help! #31
Looks like a fairly classic finrot bacterium going to work, small flecks are just localised skin infections, but the red veins in the tail are a bit more serious showing that theres some hypervascularisation, either from o2 starvation or the beginnings of septacaemia. What are the latest water stats?

If they do come up ok, i'd go to the next step up from mela and pima and go for an organic dye treatment, protozin is worth a shot, or if you feel the disease is accelerating quickly and it does sound like it, perhaps pop to the vet for some antibiotics.
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longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 25/4/2009 11:41
Re: Which Compact Camera? #32
Lot of the prosumer lumix's get good reviews, theres probably nothing wrong with the camera, the 12x optical will come in very handy and lend to great shot versatility.
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longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 25/4/2009 11:08
Re: Chocolate Oranda face being eaten away by something - HELP #33
Does look like flavobacterium is doing the rounds again, possibly combined with Yersinia ruckeri (enteric redmouth). Nothing on the shelves will touch either if its a serious strain, given the very short killing time it would probably be flavobacterium. It would have been a job for antibiotics from a vet or furan 2 again. Yersini tends to repond to oxytetracyline or sulphonomide treatments.
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longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 24/4/2009 7:59
Re: Fish doing Somersaults!!!??? PLEASE HELP! #34
Nope its not optimistic, its a possibility, a fish in physical shock from injury can lose orientation, and be afflicted with a sort of "hyperstimulation syndrome" where repeated shock responses are more likely, though usually for a short period, you only have to drop one to find that out.

Just keep a close eye, if more symptoms show, go for the treatment.
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longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 24/4/2009 7:50
Re: Which Compact Camera? #35
I think the heavy pink tones on that ricoh would be irritating, other than that looks fine though, if you dont mind desaturating some of the pinks in an editor its probably fine.
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longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 23/4/2009 5:27
Re: Which Compact Camera? #36
Actually looking down that list the Fujifilm FinePix F100fd doesnt look half bad, the clarity is good in the test shots.If you can cope with the slower times I think the ixus are looking good though.

Nikon coolpix s610 looks pretty neat for a compact too. Much cheaper than they used to be.

Liking the look of this one, its the modern equivalent of my old s2IS which I adored, but bloody hell, thats dslr money!
http://www.cameras.co.uk/reviews/canon-powershot-sx1-is.cfm

Quite like your original choice there eaglec , the clarity is great on the water and the boats in the test shots and the lens glass obviously has a minor polariser which helps with skies, but its not the quickest camera. If you want to cough up for it, get that!
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longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 23/4/2009 5:07
Re: Which Compact Camera? #37
Handy little shutter lag table here.

http://www.cameras.co.uk/html/shutter-lag-comparisons.cfm

Tbh with the smaller canons the lag is more pronounced when the flash is on, it takes a while to calibrate, its kind of a known problem with them, without it , theyre fine. In this league of cameras fujis will be faster, but the light fringing under bright light on some pictures ive seen would really annoy me. My gf 's camera is pants for that.
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longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 23/4/2009 4:59
Re: Swimbladder problem #38
On kuhli's ,was it aeromonas, mycobacteriosis, or a neurologically active protozoan like myxo? Probably all three, but people called it "skinny disease" and totally missed the point of finding root cause and threw antibiotics at it.Some got lucky, some did'nt.Even when it was mycobacterium did the people think its infection level ceased just because their loaches died, did they consider its still in their aquarium to this day? Its antibiotic resistant. When people killed weather loaches, did they consider the aeromonas that probably did it is still in their goldfish, just that their goldfish is a carrier and not really sick?

Same with HITH, is it nutritional, is it hexamita protozoan, is it one circumstance increasing the chance of symptom and an incubation period or lower impact than people realise that could go on for even years undetected. Is it a lack of calcium or does the parasite drain the calcium from the animal? Again, all five, but you call it HITH and generalise and you'll never know.

I'd ask that people get the post mortems done with bacteriology reports, but who pays ?40 plus for a small dead fish that cost a couple of quid? Plus add the fact when you ask for one, they look for a couple of obvious things and ignore the other possibilities and you wonder what you paid for. Often the answer you get back is "a bacteria". Which is....YEAH, RIGHT,YOU MUPPET! territory.

We do need more fish pathology. I do a bit myself here or there, but its not like a have a facility for it and a staff. Our problem as fishkeepers both amateur and pro is we have a nasty touch of denial, and when it comes to investigation we want the cost to be shouldered by someone else, so we ask if people have already researched it. In this case the answer is yes , they have but for a bit of digging, but usually the answer will be , well no, not unless its a salmon a trout or a catfish that people eat. With that answer we go back to assumming it can't be the case. Its not a productive way to go about things really.

It would be cool (in a very morbid way) to walk into a p&h , buy all their stock, run extended observation on, make cultures, take samples then euthanise the lot, and get the full disease spectrum of every fish in there tested until theres nothing left to test.

I think the results would suprise the hell out of people. You wouldnt believe just how many global diseases, some diseases that fish shouldnt even have under natural circumstances will be in a shop near you. You'd be looking at the results , and scratching your head thinking "how the hell did it pick that up?"

Its all about transgressed barriers. Most shops will have at least some level of what I would call the "big twelve" on their premises, the big primary pet fish killers. Thats not even including regular stuff like roundworms.

We have a weird attitude to diseases in this hobby. Surely it has to change.
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longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 23/4/2009 4:29
Re: Swimbladder problem #39
There was some research done prior to 2006 specifically on myxo by cambridge university , it involved some screening of aquarium and farmed species and a lot of hobby species tested positive for infection especially in the danio groups, but I cant think of the name of the paper now.

Florida did a similar research and its also known to hit marines like sculpins , and damselfish. Its not what you'd call widely occurring in marine beyond the salmonid family, because of the parasites host stage needs, it would be common in fish like cut-throat trout because of their predaroy preferences, but its more a disease of the breeder facility where cross transmission due to feeding practises occur, but theres more than one strain of the parasite too, though symptomology is similar.

So much so that some govt organisations have guidelines on the matter. If you google vertabrae deformity in danio species and also in guppies you'll hit quite a few results. Could even be that lab animals got to the hobby having been deliberately infected at some stage (danio rerio is your classic lab rat of a fish).The usage of cheap fish meals could also increase transmission to hobby species, primarily because it can circumvent the parasites indirect lifecycle. The parasite is only host specific because of the food chain, there is not however a biological barrier that prevents its spread to other species. Pretty much seems to be the case, that give or take a touch of resistance (most loaches seem almost completely immune)it can affect most species. I was personally witness to a microbiology report on a rainbowfish a few years back where it was confirmed, and australia is dead hot on trying to keep it under control with feed regulations. I think even defra know about this one.

I think its more of a case of investigation serving financial need than what range of species it effects, the salmonids are the commercial drive for research, whereas the hobby imperative for investment is limited.Wouldnt be suprised if more than 99% of cases go unreported.

Its a bit like badgers getting the blame for TB in the uk and persecuted for it, when a lot of small mammals, hedgehogs, deer etc can transmit to livestock. Narrow focus issue. Same with hexamitiasis, people see it as a cichlid disease, but it infects just as many goldfish. Its a bit like metacarcaria in snails, people think only snail eaters get it, you'd expect puffers to go down with it, but wouldt assume a tetra or guppy would, but crush a snail and let your guppies eat it, they get it. We as keepers transgress boundaries, and thats what we get.

I mean who expected to see fish with aflatoxis, why are aeromonads and pseudomonads as common as they are- its the aquarium substrate environment and mixed continental stocking, why is whitespot so common because we keep fish at density and rarely QT. IPNV has spread beyond basic labyrinth fish because of feeder culture. Almost every species has a hexamitiasis risk (though mortality rates vary widely between species)because cichlids and some rift cats are more mainstream and because of goldfish used as feeders. Mycobacteria is more common than ever because of imported bettas and linked shop systems that have no qt and are never given rest periods or decor cleaned regularly enough, they may house it for decades unchallenged. Its what we do, as keepers and especially as breeders on a budget, especially out east in vast facilities where QT is a joke and foodstuffs are whatever is cheapest, we transgress boundaries of infection.

The future of disease awareness will involve many more such incidences, and we have to get faster at spotting the potential. More farmed fish, more bred fish, more fish on linked systems, cheap feeds, feeder culture, not taking advantage of natural barriers or violating them. These are our tomorrows.

Think about the kuhli loach, why did it fall from favour? It was the one loach that wasnt immune, and live tubifex sourced from god knows where was the big thing 10 years ago. We wiped em out in the hobby
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longhairedgit longhairedgit
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  • Posted on: 23/4/2009 3:34
Re: to LHG about praying mantids and plants #40
Oh, I wouldnt go paludarium with mantids, the super high humidy will inhibit their breathing, plus they are supercarnivores for an insect, they can even eat small lizards, I wouldnt put them past catching a frog and eating it. They pretty much sit there all day passively hunting, if theres ever a way to get to the frog they will figure it out.
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