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james15 james15
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  • Posted on: 17/6/2016 16:35
Re: Timer Plugs #31
Ah OK. I can't recall ever having come across a really small timer plug, I think they're all a bit big. Having a quick look the smallest I've found is 76mm wide which would still be a bit big for a power strip. I've got one I sometimes use for Christmas lights which actually has a short cable and a normal plug attached to it, but it's mechanical and very old, and approximately the size and weight of a brick. As far as I know they don't make them like that any more, but it did make me think maybe you could plug normal timers into short extension leads? You could make your own extension leads if you're OK with electrics (if in doubt, don't!!), just buy a trailing socket, some cable (ideally 1.25mm or larger) and a plug. That way you could make them whatever length you like, a foot or so would probably do.


james15 james15
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  • Posted on: 16/6/2016 17:07
Re: Timer Plugs #32
I use this. One of the 4 sockets is timer controlled, which I use for the lights, the other 3 are permanently on for the filter, heater, and air pump. It's a nice neat solution for fish tanks. Had it about 4 years now it's been great, the only thing I've found is that the clock tends to run slightly fast so I have to adjust it occasionally. (Ignore the low ratings on Amazon, that's just because Amazon's description doesn't mention that only 1 socket is timer controlled, so some customers have given it a 1-star rating because they expected all 4 to be timer controlled.)


james15 james15
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  • Posted on: 15/6/2016 16:20
Re: Goldfish lying on bottom of tank #33
Quote:

Janet656 wrote:
I have changed water again today about 80% this time and included no additives


Did you still use tap safe? If you don't use this or an equivalent product the chlorine in tap water will kill your filter bacteria and harm your fish.


james15 james15
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  • Posted on: 13/6/2016 17:52
Re: Moving the tank to a new house #34
I would recommend keeping as much of the old water as you can. Doesn't have to be all of it necessarily but the more the better, as this reduces any change in the water chemistry in the tank. As your tank is relatively small it shouldn't be too much of a challenge to keep most of the water.
As far as the filter is concerned, keep it running as long as possible. When you have to unplug it, put the media in a container of old tank water. If it is likely to be unplugged for more than about half an hour, consider adding an airstone to the container, run from a battery powered air pump (recommend JAD or Boyu). This way most of the filter bacteria should survive the journey.


james15 james15
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  • Posted on: 23/5/2016 18:04
Re: Stocking Advice #35
Just to add, if you're starting from scratch we strongly recommend a fishless cycle using ammonia to build up the bacterial colonies in the filter which will process fish waste. Check out our fishless cycling article for more info.
As for your stock, as Nathan said Seriously Fish is a good source of info, and also our caresheets. Between the two you'll find all the info you need on compatibility, tank requirements, water chemistry and temperature. A good start would be to get readings for the hardness and pH of your local tap water. You should be able to get that info from your water supplier's website - there should be a page where you can enter your postcode and get a water quality report for your area. Better still get a test kit (liquid not strips) and test it yourself, particularly the pH as this can change when the water is left to stand. If you can choose fish to match your tap water, this will make things a lot easier long term.
Any questions just ask and we'll do our best to help.


james15 james15
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  • Posted on: 22/5/2016 18:11
Re: Water Change #36
Both of those species should really be in a bigger tank. Minnows require a minimum of 60 litres and danios require a minimum of 90 litres. 22 litres is not considered an adequate sized tank for fish, despite often being sold as such, and is really only suitable for shrimps and snails. Also as both minnows and danios are shoaling species, they should be kept in larger groups, which a 22 litre tank obviously will not allow. My advice would be to either rehome them or upgrade to a bigger tank. Have a look at our caresheets for more info on the requirements of the species you have.
Do you have readings for the ammonia, nitrite and nitrate levels in your tank?


james15 james15
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  • Posted on: 19/5/2016 16:30
Re: Can this be correct? Not far off from cycling in 3 days. #37
You're quite right those filter start products are useless. And as you've just discovered it's often not a good idea to rely on the advice they give you in shops...the advice some of them give is shocking!


james15 james15
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  • Posted on: 16/5/2016 17:11
Re: Water Change #38
20% is one fifth so divide by 5. 22 divided by 5 is 4.4.
22 litres is very small, what have you got in there?


james15 james15
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  • Posted on: 16/5/2016 17:08
Re: Can this be correct? Not far off from cycling in 3 days. #39
Yes definitely use ammonia rather than fish food. The fish food method is unreliable as it takes a few days for the food to break down and start producing ammonia, which would also explain your readings. Most fish food is actually designed to resist decay so uneaten food doesn't pollute the water. Using ammonia for cycling means dosage is instant and accurate, so much quicker and easier.


james15 james15
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  • Posted on: 14/5/2016 17:09
Re: Can this be correct? Not far off from cycling in 3 days. #40
Hi and welcome

There's no way a tank would cycle in 3 days. As your ammonia reading is zero I assume you haven't added any ammonia to your tank? In which case you have nothing more or less than a tank full of 3-day-old water. In order to do a fishless cycle you need to be adding ammonia to the tank to simulate fish waste, allowing the development of the bacteria which will process the waste. Without ammonia as a food source nothing will happen. Check out our fishless cycling article for more info on how to do this. If you have added ammonia to the tank and you're still getting a zero reading then you're either doing the test wrong or you've got a faulty test kit.
Your nitrate reading of 20ppm will be what's present in your tap water.
I assume the filter was not running during the week the tank was empty? In which case the bacteria would have died off so it would have no effect on cycling.



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