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OzzMosiz OzzMosiz
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  • Posted on: 23/2/2004 22:43
Re: Swimming patterns/mating?! #262191
Angela, the smaller fish is most likely male. He may develop breeding stars on his gill plates and the front edge of the pectoral fins. The other fish is likely female. Remember you need to test for ammonia and nitrates as well as Nitrites. PH is also useful to test.


OzzMosiz OzzMosiz
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  • Posted on: 23/2/2004 22:39
Re: Is this anything to worry about? .... #262192
biorbs are not designed for goldfish, goldfish need lots more water. Approx 45 litres per goldfish - that is the answer.


OzzMosiz OzzMosiz
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  • Posted on: 23/2/2004 22:38
Re: shubunkin in a tropical tank in emergency? #262193
shift the temp no more than 4oF per 24 hours until your fish has acclimatised. Remember your goldie produces much more waste than your trops and could poison them - make sure you do clean up if and when you introduce into tropical - its certainly not ideal, but better than nothing.


FishFool FishFool
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  • Posted on: 23/2/2004 11:42
Re: shubunkin in a tropical tank in emergency? #262194
Thanks for the advice.


marcshedden marcshedden
  • Posted on: 22/2/2004 18:01
Re: shubunkin in a tropical tank in emergency? #262195
Hi,
A temperature of 24 is going to stress the shubunkin excessively, especially as it has recently been exposed to very low temperatures - you might end up allowing a disease such as whitespot to come to the fore and spread to your tropicals. I would keep it on its own at room temperature until the spring/summer, when it can go back outside - you can get an adequate holding tank with equipment very cheaply these days (second hand set-ups from the local Free Ads paper might be the best way to go).
Shubunkins can be kept outside without any problems usually, but in a small tub like yours make sure you switch off the circulating pump in the winter, so a layer of slightly warmer water can form on the bottom, where the fish will stay in a semi-dormant state until the weather warms up again.
Hope that helps,
Marc


FishFool FishFool
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  • Posted on: 21/2/2004 20:02
shubunkin in a tropical tank in emergency? #262196
Can a Bristol shubunkin (2 inch long excluding tail) live in a tropical fish tank for 6 weeks. Fish was bought last week and put in 100L tub outside but we have a cold snap (aitr temp 1C). I found him today floating on top and very sluggish. Gold fish bought at same time had died. Shubunkin is now inside in a Tupperware tub and has perked up. Can he room with my tropical fish (temprature76F 24C) until the weather warms up? The alternative is a bucket.

I am experienced with tropical fish, but know nothing abut coldwater fish. I don’t think a disease is involved.

Can I keep this sort of fish outside (they were sold as pond fish) in a 300L tub?

Thanks


jonesey jonesey
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  • Posted on: 17/2/2004 22:41
Fish faeces #262197
Can anyone help. I have set up a marine tank after many years and have noticed that the faeces discarded by the fish is of a white colour and is shaped like a string hanging from the fish.
I recall that the faeces should be a dark colour and disolve on contact with the water and the best way to change this is to feed live food or lettuce leaves.
Can anyone clarify this, I would be most grateful.
Thanks

fish at present are two electric blue damsels and a blue surgeonfish


Miles Miles
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  • Posted on: 8/2/2004 4:01
Re: Help please #262198
Hi,

I am going through a similar problem...but I know mine is white spot disease (ich). I noticed it on my cowfish immediatly...however only noticed it on my coral beauty because it was scrathing itself - coudnt really see the spots until it was covered.

Has the behaviour of you fish changed at all? feeding? color? it could possibly be a inernal parasite...in which case you would have to check or get it checked under the microscope...you can either investigate the fish droppingd...or do a disection when the fish dies - to find ut what it is.

Janina


Miles Miles
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  • Posted on: 8/2/2004 3:47
Re: White Spot Disease #262199
Thanks Mark.

I have been treating the main tank as well...but my coral beauty now has white spots too. I also moved it into the quanrantine tank - in with the cowfish...but am now scared about my cowfish as it is just on its way to recovering. so do I move it back to the main tank or leave it in the quarantine tank with the coral beauty? I was told freshwater baths are good for treating ich - would you recomend them? I am assuming my fire fish (last fish) will also get it...but I am not sure if i can dose the main tank up anymore as one of my corals is not looking too happy.

I know the best think to do would be to put each fish into a seperate quarantine tank...but that is just going to cost a fortune - unless I can quaratine them in buckets with an airator? I just think that will stess the poor little fish too much.

Janina


marcshedden marcshedden
  • Posted on: 6/2/2004 18:39
Re: White Spot Disease #262200
Hi,
The whitespot parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis has a three-stage life cycle which can take up to 20 days to complete, so three weeks in a quarantine tank before reintroducing the fish would be the best way to go. The main tank should be treated as well, to kill off the parasites remaining there, but obviously you have to be very careful that the treatment you use is coral-safe and be sure not to overdose.
Good Luck!
Marc