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Deuce Deuce
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  • Posted on: 1/8/2007 19:27
Can a mod read this please? #21
Just a quick question for a mod!

I have recently setup a new online shop selling pretty much everything you could need for any type of fishkeeping (still need to add a lot of marine filter/skimmer stuff and a few ranges of pond pump and filter though...) and its all at absolute cheapest on the net prices.

I wanted to know if its ok to post about the site and special offers on here and also would appreciate the feedback from some of the site members.

Obs I realise that if I was lucky enough to get a lot of traffic from this forum It would only be fair that I pay or contribute in the future for a proper ad. At the moment just want some genuine hobbyist feedback though!

the site is www.warehouse-aquatics.co.uk

Have already processed quite a few orders so I know it all works fine.


Deuce


Deuce Deuce
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  • Posted on: 19/10/2006 0:36
Re: air when water change? #22
A momentary stream of air bubbles is not a proble, you will find the bubbles will clear pretty quickly.

The only worry you should have is a pump running dry - as mentioned already this can damage the pump but more importantly a pump running dry pushes micro diffused air bubbles into the tank which because salt water is very viscous tend to hang in the tank and become constantly recirculating. Each time the air bubbles get dragged through a pump they become finer until eventually they can enter a fishes bloodstream through the gills and eyes. I once worked in a shop when the system started to suck air during the night and in the morning every tank was full of tiny bubbles an half the marine stock had died!

Don't let the pumps run dry


Deuce Deuce
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  • Posted on: 19/10/2006 0:20
Re: My new project #23
It's true it is basically impossible to lay a large area of concrete without risking cracking. If you lay it thick as it cures it may well crack - if laid thin it won't crack due to curing but can do because of the underlaying support compressing. The Thomas cook feature above was laid in two stages, one thick lair followed by a thin finish layer which avoids both problems.

I guess the best advice is if your a hobbyist do it yourself and fix the cracks before applying the resin. If it is a corporate project do it the expensive way from day one and make sure the installation company will back up their work!

Most of my companies work is finish lair concrete laid upon a reinforced basin, and that is pretty much foolproof.

I still say G4 is the superior product if anyone else is going to paint their own pond



Deuce Deuce
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  • Posted on: 12/10/2006 8:30
Re: New service - RO water fresh and salted delivered in Cambs #24
I would have no worries about keeping it for at least a month, a cool dark place is best. RO water is very close to pure H20 so there is nothing really left in there to stagnate go bad in any way.

Premixed slatwater is also very stable so long as its kept sealed and cool.



Deuce Deuce
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  • Posted on: 10/10/2006 18:06
Re: CARBON THEORIES #25
A lot of questions!

Most of the systems we setup are looked after by ourselves, we often encourage people to go down the fish only route as it is just much much easier. People who own resturants dont want a guy with a test kit popping in 3 times a week! We do have reef tanks as well of course and to be honest we use polyfilters in ALL our systems.

A sensibly stocked tank with plenty of liverock and only a powerhead and heater will run fine, I've seen it done. But even in that instance chemical filtration would still be a benefit. If a coral needs iodine for example it will be absorbed by the coral much faster than the polyfilter - the polyfilter will eventually take almost everything out but certainly not quickly enough to deprive your livestock. More than anything else it removes Nitrate, Nitrite, Ammonia, Copper and Phosphate and heavy metals so the biggest difference any hobbyist will notice on any system is that brown/green algae is reduced or irradicated and all your corals will open up more. Corals mostly perfer a Nitrate of less than 15ppm which can take some doing the natural way unless you have a very low stocking level. Whats more a polyfilter acts as a safety cushion - what if you have a natural system and your anemone dies at 2 am and you dont realise for 7 hours?..

The is really no such thing as a natural aquarium, in nature the tiny reefs are flushed clean with flow from the surrounding massive oceans. That simply cant happen in a fishtank so you could argue that putting in a product to chemically remove nitrate etc is actually replcing that part of nature and adding stability therfore making the tank more natural.



Deuce Deuce
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  • Posted on: 9/10/2006 22:24
Re: water changes #26
Its possible the retailer you spoke to is speaking from experience. If the tank was well matured and well stocked with living rock then there is no reason why leaving it for months would cause harm.

However you should try harder than not causing harm, fresh saltwater contains many trace elements that are rapidly depleted. The more frequently you add new saltwater the more essential elements you introduce back into the tank. If you can afford to change 25l of water a day your tank will be better for it!

I would personally say once a week 10% will be fine and probably better than most hobbyists manage.

Everytank looks better the day after a water change.


Deuce Deuce
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  • Posted on: 9/10/2006 22:17
Re: CARBON THEORIES #27
This is the one

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Underworld-Poly ... ZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

Its an Underworld product, expensive but cheaper overall than carbon.


Deuce Deuce
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  • Posted on: 8/10/2006 18:08
Re: our installation of marine aquarium in Amman, Jordan #28
Hence Dennerle! Any hoobyist who buys their book is bound to lead a life obsessed with their tank!

If someone has a perfectly trimmed planted tank you can be in no doubt that they also iron their underwear and are fond of stamps.

I do think there are some stunning displays though... anyone on here got a good one? (if so ignore my comments - I don't even wear pants)


Deuce Deuce
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  • Posted on: 8/10/2006 17:25
Re: our installation of marine aquarium in Amman, Jordan #29
I meant USA/EUROPE - most of the equipment I use is german so of course you are right.

Fishkeeping isnt really that big in Japan though, and I was only reffering to fishkeeping technology! The worse modern country for fishkeeping hardware is probably Australia - but then I guess they have very little need to recreate the perfect reef system when they have the biggest in the world for pretty much free lol


Deuce Deuce
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  • Posted on: 8/10/2006 16:07
Re: CARBON THEORIES #30
Its better to use chemical filtration than not and as you say use supplements regularly to counteract the absorbtion. Carbon is great in freshwater and eveybit as effective in marine tanks but not particulalrly safe. If the salt density increases for example the carbon will leech back most of what it has removed. Also the quality is never constant so one pack may be fine for weeks, the next could be dodgy after just a few days.

Carbon is still mostly good news but why not use a polyfilter instead? they never release anything and you can tell from its colour when it needs replacing AND what sort of stuff it has absorbed the most. useful eh?



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