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finnipper finnipper
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  • Posted on: 15/10/2013 20:09
Re: Mbu Puffer fish #21
Yes I agree, and that's the absolute minimum which should be considered.


finnipper finnipper
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  • Posted on: 15/10/2013 18:47
Re: Mbu Puffer fish #22
I'm quite surprised after reading message after message telling folk that their tank isn't big enough and with the big fish campaign being promoted on here, that this is even considered as being anywhere near adequate.

The absolute minimum for the width should be 2x the fish's adult length, and lets be honest even that wouldn't offer very much for the fish's quality of life. The slow moving argument has never been used when accessing the tank size required for fancy goldfish so why is it being used for this fish?

Unless these and similar fish can be housed properly, i.e where they can exhibit natural behaviour they really shouldn't be kept. Remember, these fish are similar in size to most koi!!! In my opinion 1200 gall is the absolute minimum.


finnipper finnipper
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  • Posted on: 15/10/2013 14:11
Re: Mbu Puffer fish #23
Recommending a 36" wide tank for a 30" fish. Does that sound right to everyone?


finnipper finnipper
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  • Posted on: 7/10/2013 23:51
Re: Sudden nitrite spike, please help urgently! #24
I don't question it has an effect, BUT does it remove 0.001 mg/l or does it remove 0.5mg/l and how much do you add?

For example if I had a 450 litre tank with 0.5 mg/l of nitrite because I didn't know about cycling just how much prime should I add to the tank to make it safe?

Indeed does anyone know for certain that this level could be made safe using prime?

This is my issue with this quite frankly poor advice - no one knows anything for sure. The fact that the makers are very reluctant to offer any dosage guidelines also is a concern because if they have done their own tests it would be a case of simple maths to formulate a dosage.

Does the nitrite reading remain the same for the "detoxified nitrite" after treating with Prime, when testing with an aquarium test kit?


finnipper finnipper
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  • Posted on: 7/10/2013 22:50
Re: Sudden nitrite spike, please help urgently! #25
It isn't a matter of trust, it is simply trying to get the full answer, the salt method works, it is understood scientifically and it is safe.

The Prime method is based on "anecdotal evidence" with no science behind the findings nor is it complete i.e the dosage information is missing along with the levels the product will treat.

This is what Seachem say:
"I wish we had some more "concrete" explanation, but the end result is the same, it does actually detoxify nitrite and nitrate. This was unexpected chemically and thus initially we were not even aware of this, however we received numerous reports from customers stating that when they overdosed with Prime they were able to reduce or eliminate the high death rates they experienced".

http://www.seachem.com/support/FAQs/Prime.html

In view of this why would this method be recommended in preference to a known and well understood treatment?


finnipper finnipper
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  • Posted on: 7/10/2013 22:15
Re: Sudden nitrite spike, please help urgently! #26
The link says "To detoxify nitrite in an emergency, up to 5 times normal dose may be used".

But it gives no idea of the levels of nitrite this treats and neither have you. Surely dosage is quite an important part of the advice so that members are aware of how much to add to treat certain levels of nitrite, otherwise the advice is worthless because it isn't complete.

Using 1/4 of a teaspoon of salt for the entire tank will block the uptake of nitrite and protect the fish completely and at that level salt intolerance isn't an issue. This level of salt will protect the fish at any level of nitrite which is likely to be found in an aquarium.

Now you can argue all you like Violet, but quite honestly I would prefer a treatment where all the facts are presented and one which works well. As opposed to one which is data inadequate (regarding dosage) and one where even the makers state publicly that they don't know how it works.


finnipper finnipper
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  • Posted on: 7/10/2013 21:04
Re: Sudden nitrite spike, please help urgently! #27
Adding 1/4 of a teaspoon of salt to the tank helps to protect the fish from nitrite by blocking its uptake. Although it is widely reported that Prime will render som ammonia/nitrite harmless I haven't seen any data about the levels where this is effective or how much ammonia/nitrite is treatable using this method.


finnipper finnipper
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  • Posted on: 7/10/2013 20:36
Re: what sex is my swordtail and are they pregnant #28
The reason that females appear to have a gonopodium is explained in this thread.

http://www.fishforums.net/index.php?/ ... -swordtail-is-now-a-male/

These things are easy to research!


finnipper finnipper
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  • Posted on: 7/10/2013 1:56
Re: what sex is my swordtail and are they pregnant #29
There is a lot of rubbish going around when it comes to sexing swordtails because they are unique when it comes to gender.

Late developing fish which appear to be female but which can turn out to be male, old females which develop a sword and what appears to be a gonopodium and so appear to be male along with a females ability to store sperm and give birth to several broods from a single mating lead people to believe that the fish is capable of changing sex. This is not the case, a functioning female (one which has given birth)cannot change in to a functioning male and a functioning male i.e one which has fathered offspring cannot become a functioning female. Sexing these fish is therefore a little hit and miss to be honest.
Gravid spots aren't always very obvious either, in some fish they are very dark and in others almost invisible. If the fish is very fat there is a reasonable chance that it is pregnant especially if it is in a mixed sex tank.


finnipper finnipper
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  • Posted on: 6/10/2013 17:48
Re: What is the Most Humane Way to Euthanize a Fish? #30
Sorry Cathie, and thank you for that link.

I have had need to euthanise fish in the past as a last resort and to prevent unnecessary suffering. Sooner or later that situation will face all fish keepers.

I made a video using the phenoxyethonol2 sedation method

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ww4SQYAuQ8

The fish in the video was actually just sedated in order to treat a facial ulcer but the video demonstrates the effectiveness of the method and if used at an higher dose and the fish left in there then death is guaranteed and in my view relatively stress free. (The fish in the clip went on to make a full recovery and is alive and well today.

Which ever method is used I would urge people not to hang on for to long waiting for a miracle recovery which is never going to happen, it is important that pain and suffering are stopped as quickly as possible.



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