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maccy_g maccy_g
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  • Posted on: 25/5/2011 15:33
Re: I'll have a P please, Bob.... (Fishless Cycle) #111
It's an interesting one but surely pee contains other toxins and nasties (after all it is a waste product) that could harbour in the tank and cause all manner of diseases etc?

I guess as we are talking about a fishless cycle those toxins may be removed after several water changes before live fish go in but there ultimately there are a lot easier and less potentially harmful ways to cycle a tank, I mean you can buy a bottle of Ammonia from Boots for a few quid....

I certainly wouldn't buy any fish from there!


maccy_g maccy_g
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  • Posted on: 20/5/2011 14:21
Re: "Fish to avoid" list? #112
I agree with what Suey2 is saying.

You have to define how big the picture you are looking at, I mean if you want to go far enough you could argue that simply the act of keeping fish in a glass container is cruel and so threby rendering the whole hobby redundant?

Equally you could also argue that by mankind becoming involved in any way in the breeding process of any type of fish is also inhibitive and cruel and we should allow nature to select which breeds live and which die - surely mankind's involvement in any breeding process could be defined as "man-made"


maccy_g maccy_g
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  • Posted on: 18/5/2011 20:19
Re: changing gravel #113
Don't change all the gravel at once, doing so may uncycle the tank - best to change it over a period of weeks if possible


maccy_g maccy_g
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  • Posted on: 16/5/2011 18:08
Re: Recommended Cold Water Fish for Biorb 30L #114
Hi,

If you are looking to keep coldwater fish, i.e goldfish for example then you will need to get a tank a lot bigger than 60 litres.

Even if you just kept 1 fancy goldfish you would need a tank of at least 140 litres and for each further fish you keep in the tank you need to increase the tank size by another 45 litres.

Fish are social animals so you would really need to keep at least 2 so you're looking at a 200l tank really - it may sound crazy but it's 100% accurate.

People often read those figures, ignore them, put 2 goldfish in a 50l biorb and then wonder their goldfish dies after a year or has stunted growth.

Stay well clear of Biorbs, it's like bringing up a dog in a wardrobe - no-one in their sane mind would ever do it, but it happens to fish all the time


maccy_g maccy_g
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  • Posted on: 12/5/2011 18:15
Re: Tank cleaning #115
Good question.

After a tank is cycled I usually do one every fortnight or so but some people do it more often or less often, I'm not really sure what the accepted norm for testing water is.

In your case I would certainly test every 3-4 days after you think the tank has cycled, just to ensure things are ticking over nicely.

I'm sure others would be to advise how often they test their water.


maccy_g maccy_g
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  • Posted on: 12/5/2011 15:24
Re: Tank cleaning #116
Yes definately as ammonia should read 0.

If a tank is fully cycled then you should never get a reading for ammonia at all, the fact you have a reading for ammonia suggests the tank is still cycling.

I would keep testing the water twice a day and keep changing the water (25% to 50% but no more than this) when you get a reading for ammonia.

As your tank is relatively small the ammonia levels are going to creep up fast until the filter has grown enough beneficial bacteria to break down the ammonia on their own, you will know when this has happened when you no longer get any readings for ammonia.


maccy_g maccy_g
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  • Posted on: 9/5/2011 17:18
Re: Tank cleaning #117
Hi,

I wouldn't worry.

Not sure what size tank you have but I have a 200l coldwater setup and do a 25% water change per week vacuuming all the gravel etc.

There's all sorts of bits floating around in the tank after a water change as vacuuming disturbs the gravel anyway and pouring fresh water back into the tank can also disturb things.

The debris will settle in a couple of hours and the filter will deal with whatever is left floating around.


maccy_g maccy_g
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  • Posted on: 23/3/2011 20:22
Re: New to fishkeeping, New tank set up recently :) #118
Understandable that you feel down and probably a bit annoyed with yourself but everyone on this board has made rookie mistakes, sometimes mistakes that have resulted in the loss of fish. It feels even worse when you think your doing everything right only to find you've done some things wrong.

If it makes you feel any better I have lost fish in the past due to my own lack of knowledge & experience even though I thought I was doing everything right. I feel terrible to have lost them but over time I have learnt from my mistakes and now have 3 happy fish who are well looked after.

Contrary to popular belief, keeping fish is not easy and unfortunately it can be a rather unforgiving hobby when you make mistakes - but on the plus side the combination of science and nature within fishkeeping make it a fascinating hobby and very rewarding when things go right.

If the worse should happen and you lose your remaining fish (which I hope doesn't happen) then my advice to you would be to have a break, take stock and do plenty of reading up on fish tanks, filters, the type of fish you want to keep and over time you'll be itching to get back into things and you'll have a 200l+ tank sitting in your livingroom before you know it.


maccy_g maccy_g
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  • Posted on: 22/3/2011 10:18
Re: New to fishkeeping, New tank set up recently :) #119
Totally agree with Ella, don't get another fish until you've addressed the tank size issue, the fish on his own would obviously prefer company but while this tank is too small it's better to leave him on his own for the time being.

If money is the main problem with getting a bigger tank, check out tanks on ebay, wherever you live I'm sure there are some bargains within 10 miles or so of where you live.

There are loads of people who buy fishtanks brand new, get bored & give up the hobby and then sell the tank on - the great thing for a buyer is that you can pay a fraction of what it's worth and still get a great tank.

I bought my 210l tank (including gravel, hood / lights, ornaments & a filter) off ebay for ?40! Sure it needed a bit of a clean etc but it looks great now, I would never buy a brand new tank as you end up paying far more than you need to.

Try and buy the biggest tank you can afford and can fit in the space you want it within your home, like I said before the bigger the tank the less maintenance you have to do.

Depending on your tank size (and what more fish you decide to get) you may also need to look at upgrading the filter, I can give you some help with this too once I know what size of tank you have and the fish you choose to keep.

Let me know how you get on.


maccy_g maccy_g
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  • Posted on: 21/3/2011 20:18
Re: New to fishkeeping, New tank set up recently :) #120
Hi,

I've been checking out those Aqua One Starter Tanks and the biggest of them all (Goldfish Starter Kit) holds 50 litres which isn't large enough to keep 2x goldfish, in fact you'd be struggling with 1 if I'm honest.

The chasing & nudging is probably caused by the cramped conditions, it may not seem cramped at all but goldfish need a lot of space to live in. To give you an idea I have a 210 litre tank and I only keep 3 Orandas in that and that is probably still regarded as overstocked (!) - sounds crazy doesn't it but it's the truth.

Goldfish are also one of the messiest (if not THE messiest) aquatic fish you can keep and so 2x goldfish could easily pollute their water to dangerously toxic levels within days Even if you could keep the 2 goldfish in a 50l tank the maintenance required to keep their water clean would be impractical and would render your keeping of them unenjoyable - the bigger the tank, the less maintenance you need to do.

This probably all sounds doom and gloom but there's some great articles on here that are definately worth reading to get your head around it.

My concern is if you persevere with the fish in the tank you have you may well get sick of all the maintenance and give up the hobby which would be a shame as it's so rewarding.

Best of luck!



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