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fcmf fcmf
  • Coldwater Adviser
  • Coldwater Adviser
  • Posted on: 11/9 19:52
Re: Frequency of water changes in a new tank #11
There are two ways to cycle a tank (or, more precisely the filter and its media), and each takes approx 6-8 weeks but sometimes longer:
* fishless - in which the filter is prepared in advance, by adding ammonia until such a time as the filter has built up sufficient beneficial bacteria to ultimately cope with processing fish waste and fish food and the fish can be fed normal levels of food from the outset - https://www.fishkeeping.co.uk/articles ... hless-cycling-article.htm
or
* fish-in - which you're doing [assuming you just let the tank sit with water in it for a week with the filter switched on, in which case the water sample tested by the LFS will just be whatever your tap water is but the filter won't actually have been cycled]

Some products do exist for attempting to speed up a cycle, but the evidence for their effectiveness is still very 'hit and miss'.

Monitor ammonia, nitrite and nitrate once or twice daily for at least the next 6-8 weeks, following this advice if need be https://www.fishkeeping.co.uk/articles ... ammonia-nitrite-spike.htm . NB. The 6-in-1 test strips don't have the crucial ammonia test, so make sure you buy a liquid-based test for that as it's important that you get accurate readings for this. Doing this as diligently as you've been doing so far will maximise the chances that your fish make it through the fish-in cycle.

You should be able to increase feeding to once per day or even two smaller feeds twice per day (beneficial for juvenile fish), and increase water changes to a 10% water change daily, *provided that you keep up the water quality monitoring as described* (and take rectifying action as per link above if required).

Hope that helps.


LisaSimon LisaSimon
  • Just popping in
  • Just popping in
  • Posted on: 11/9 18:21
Frequency of water changes in a new tank #12
Hello,

Fish were first added to my new tank on 24th August - before that it had been cycling for a week - from 17th August.
After the initial cycle I took a water sample to my lfs who tested it & said it was now safe to add fish to. So I added my fish and they said to do 10% water changes every 2 days while the filter builds up the safe bacteria (sorry I don’t know all the correct lingo yet!), and to feed them a couple of pellets per fish every 2-3 days.

I’ve been doing this religiously and everything seems fine, have been testing with tetra 6 in 1 test strips every few days and I think everything is looking good. N02 was borderline for a few days but so far so good - the lfs said that was normal and just to continue with the water changes - that was about 10 days ago.

So my question is, how long should I keep doing 10% water changes for and when is the right time to feed them daily? I feel like I’m starving them at the moment!


fcmf fcmf
  • Coldwater Adviser
  • Coldwater Adviser
  • Posted on: 11/9 3:44
Re: Second tank and moving fish! #13
Generally, bettas are best kept on their own (a single male on its own or a sorority of females) rather than with other fish. Sometimes, depending on the personality of the individual fish, it is possible to keep them with other fish, but it's always best to have a back-up plan if the situation goes awry - such as transferring the other fish into the larger tank (subject to compatibility with the fish in there).

The filter currently in your 60L tank will have sufficient bacteria in its filter media to support the fish in that tank (i.e. process their waste). All you need to do is fill the 200L tank with dechlorinated water (unless you use RO water, in which case ensure that it's in the same proportions as in the 60L), ensure that the temperature reaches the same as in the 60L tank, then transfer the 60L tank's filter and its media plus the fish together into the 200L. If you decide to transfer over the substrate and decor, that's fine too as some beneficial bacteria live there too albeit most of it is in the filter.

Personally, I find that: fish inhabiting the upper levels of the tank (e.g. rasboras) will quite willingly swim into a jug and thus making for an easy / stress-free transfer; fish inhabiting lower levels (e.g. tetras) are best moved via a couple of large nets, ideally guiding them into a green-coloured net which is more easily associated with safety due to being plant-coloured.


meghanf meghanf
  • Just popping in
  • Just popping in
  • Posted on: 10/9 18:01
Second tank and moving fish! #14
hello, I'm new to this forum thing but I'm after some new opinions.

I've recently brought myself a bigger tank (200L), as i currently only have a 60L. My ultimate dream with these tanks is to have the smaller tank as a super planted up tank with a betta fish, tetras etc and my new bigger tank as my display tank, I'm unsure what fish i would like to put in there yet...just trying to get my hardscape done is proving difficult!!

Anyway, the question I have is, about 80% of my fish currently in my 60L I would like in my 200L, whilst I'm pulling almost all my fish out, What would be the possibility of pulling all the fish out to re-scape the smaller one.. since this might be my only chance? If it is a possibility whats the correct way of going about this?

Also, whilst I'm here. What would be the best way to transfer my fish from the 60L to the 200L. I've seen loads of different suggestions but just wondering if anyone has anymore?

Thankyou in advance.
Meg


PH12345 PH12345
  • Just popping in
  • Just popping in
  • Posted on: 10/9 9:43
Re: Sick goldfish, please help to identify #15
Can't thank you enough for your advice, I will add carbon for the next few days and and will do 50% water changes today and tomorrow and then start the treatment.
Thank you so much!


Fishlady Fishlady
  • Tropical Moderator
  • Tropical Moderator
  • Posted on: 10/9 7:20
Re: Sick goldfish, please help to identify #16
Do a couple of big (50%) water changes and then start treatment.


PH12345 PH12345
  • Just popping in
  • Just popping in
  • Posted on: 9/9 19:33
Re: Sick goldfish, please help to identify #17
Thank you Fishlady! I have just ordered some Waterlife Myxazin from Amazon. How long do I have to wait before I can treat the tank with it? I added the last dosage of AquaCare Anti-fungus and whitespot (malachite green and formaldehyde) yesterday (08/09/19). Should I do some water changes and wait for 7 days? Or is it safe to treat sooner? Thank you!


Fishlady Fishlady
  • Tropical Moderator
  • Tropical Moderator
  • Posted on: 9/9 13:57
Re: Newbie- stocking advice #18
If you don't want breeding that rules out the livebearers (platy, molly, guppy, endler, swordtail), but they wouldn't like your soft water anyway.

You could go for a pair or group of angelfish, a school of larger tetras like the phantoms or lemon tetras and a shoal of Corydoras such as Corydoras sterbai . If you don't like angels you could have a couple of pairs of Apistogramma instead. Alternatively, go for an Asian stock list and have a group of honey gourami, a shoal of one of the more peaceful barbs such as the rosy barb or harlequin rasboras and some dwarf chain loaches.


Fishlady Fishlady
  • Tropical Moderator
  • Tropical Moderator
  • Posted on: 9/9 13:50
Re: Sick goldfish, please help to identify #19
I think the fish probably has a bacterial infection which can be treated with Esha 2000 or Waterlife Myxazin.


PH12345 PH12345
  • Just popping in
  • Just popping in
  • Posted on: 9/9 8:59
Re: Sick goldfish, please help to identify #20
Another angle of the "hanging skin"

Attach file:



jpg  hanging skin2.jpg (2,309.75 KB)
22578_5d761474add8b.jpg 4032X2268 px



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